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  Interview with a Fangirl: Kat


I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is a great pleasure to interview fellow Fangirl, Kat.

Kat is a college senior, hoping to pursue a career in the film industry after graduation. She adores movies, tv, and all things scifi. She writes regularly on these topics for her school newspaper.  I became aware of Kat through my interaction with her through both the Star Wars and Doctor Who Fan Communities.

Welcome Kat to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl. It is an honor that you took the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

I think in some ways I was always a fangirl. I have a naturally obsessive and passionate personality for better or worse. I never really channeled it into positive outlets until a few years ago when I fell in love with science fiction. I’d always avoided a lot of it because I’m afraid of space and I figured it would upset me. But it turns out it does the complete opposite, and I’ve found lots of inspiration from it instead. I realized I’d officially turned into a fangirl when I showed up to the theater premiere of Doctor Who series 8 dressed in Doctor Who gear from head to toe and my friend had to tell me to “turn down.” (I haven’t turned down, not even a little).

How has social media helped or hindered you?

Oh gosh social media has been the best. It’s sometimes hard to find people in person who like the same things to the same degree. I mean lots of people like stuff, but not as many live and breathe the stuff they like. That’s where Tumblr and Twitter come in, for me. There’s always a community of people on there that is passionate about the same things. There’s always someone eager to discuss the fresh news on our favorite franchises. Oh and the memes. The memes are incredible.

Kat with the late Carrie Fisher

Kat with the late Carrie Fisher

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I grew up on Star Wars. I made up songs about it as a little kid and forced my family to listen to my terrible rhymes. As I grew up, I lost touch with fandom. I had a lot of issues with mental health as a teenager and young adult which took precedence. But as I got better a few years ago, I came back to fangirling and now it’s basically my life. I still adore Star Wars, and fall more in love with it with each new release. I’m a big Trekkie, which is probably my hardest fandom to find in person friends for. Marvel is my most recent obsession. I love most science fiction and fantasy things, but those are the ones that I obsess over most. A lot of times I’ll see something for the first time and like it, but I won’t get hooked until the second watch.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

The greatest impact being in these fan communities has had on me is on my confidence. There used to be so much shame surrounding being a fangirl. I spent a while being too ashamed to talk about the things I loved. But being in touch with these communities both in person and through the internet has taught me to be proud of my passions. I no longer hesitate to divulge my interests when asked and I even start my own conversations about it now. And being able to do that has allowed me to make friends more easily. I wear all kinds of geeky clothing, which can be a really useful conversation starter. I also go to cons and am developing my cosplay skills. Attending a con is one of the greatest feelings of acceptance I’ve ever felt. Everyone there is on your team. I always try to carry that out into the real world when I leave.

What else do you Fangirl about?

I’m really into movie scores and I fangirl about my favorite scores and composers. I can get quite worked up about it.

Where can other Fangirls connect with you? 

You can find me on Twitter or Instagram @moviescoregirl.

Interview with a Fangirl: Jessie


I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is a great pleasure to interview fellow Blogger, SWTOR Gamer and Fangirl, Jessie Stardust.

Jessie as Master Satele Shan (<i>Star Wars The Old Republic</i> era Jedi) at <i>Star Wars Celebration Anaheim</i>

Jessie as Master Satele Shan (Star Wars The Old Republic era Jedi) at Star Wars Celebration Anaheim

I became aware of Jessie through the Twitter Star Wars Fan Community.

Welcome Jessie to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl. It is an honor that you took the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

I didn’t realize or maybe accept that I was a fangirl and a nerd until later in life. I had always loved Star Wars– a LOT- but until I started playing a Star Wars video game, I never really saw myself as anything other than just a plain old fan. My realization hit me after 30!

How has social media helped or hindered you?

Social media, namely Twitter, has helped me immensely! It connects people with similar interests and fandoms and geekerytogether and accomplishes a couple of important things: 1- Gives me a sense of community and belonging, 2- leads me to all sorts of really cool stuff I might never have found on my own.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I saw Star Wars (you know, before it was called A New Hope) in the theater at release with my mom. I recall it vividly. I can say it’s one of my top childhood memories. I recall the sound of the Stormtroopers boots on the gleaming floor, the way Leia wore her hair and how Luke swung across the dangerous gap with her on his hip almost as if they were my OWN memories and not those of a film.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

I have learned that we all have something to offer. Many of us write, draw, edit screenshots, make fan videos, do podcasts, stream gameplay, etc. I think being a megafan pushes you to express your love in creative ways and helps you tap into your unique talents. Being surrounded so many others having these experiences makes a rich community full of creative energy.

What else do you Fangirl about?

I love Tudor-era English history and I fangirl about Anne Boleyn. I am a huge dog fangirl as well!

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

I think it’s been a wonderful way to connect people from diverse situations, across the globe. Men, women and children of all religions, political affiliations, and social backgrounds can find things to love together, debate and theorize wildly about. On a personal level, I like having a safe escape, an alternate galaxy that makes more sense at times than the Milky Way. The stories are parables that can teach us what it is to be a hero and to make choices for the good of others, to stand up to evil where we see it. The books, films, games, music, LEGOs and all of the other wonderful Star wars stuff is soothing and gives me happiness. I find going back to them can be like a touchstone in anxious or trying times.

Thanks again Jessie for stopping by today and letting us get to know you better!

You can learn more about Jessie by following her on Twitter, @unholyalliances, or visiting for blog, tatooinedreams.com.

Guest Post on Star Cruise: Outbreak

The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl again welcomes author Veronica Scott as a guest blogger to talk about her story Star Cruise: Outbreak.

Take it away Veronica!

Guest Post on Star Cruise: Outbreak by Veronica Scott

Thanks for having me as your guest today!

I decided to focus on Star Cruise: Outbreak for this interview because it was recently honored with a double SFR Galaxy Award mention and I thought it might be a timely topic. The novel also received a third place award in the Judge A Book By Its Cover contest, judged by professional book sellers, which was exciting but mostly due to the artistry of Fiona Jayde, who does all my wonderful SFR book covers.

What kind of research did you have to do for this novel?

It was my usual combination of many various topics that would come together on board the interstellar cruise ship Nebula Zephyr. I had to research the cruise industry, to have lots of cool amenities for my passengers, and so I looked at travel blogs, the union for cruise ship workers, job listings, books on running large ships successfully, etc. I also did ‘research’ by watching current reality shows like “Below Deck,” and I read the synopsis of every single episode of the old TV show “Love Boat,” trying to get a feel for what overall story and worldbuilding elements contributed to it being such a successful program. And of course long ago, I’d done my research into Titanic for the book Wreck of the Nebula Dream, so I still have those notes on cruise ships and the passengers.

I also had to do extensive research into communicable diseases, with emphasis on the types found on cruise ships or other closed environments. I read up on Legionnaire’s disease and even brain eating amoebas. Yes, watching the TV shows on cruises was more fun than perusing medical sites, but I had to create a plausible and terrifying illness for my cruise ship, and keep the symptoms and prognosis believable as the crisis continues. I don’t know about you but if I read too much on sites like WebMD and the Mayo Clinic, I start convincing myself I have every single disease known to man LOL. I do know I don’t have the one afflicting the Nebula Zephyr.

And the third aspect I researched was PTSD, particularly for medical personnel who served in frontline combat hospitals. There were several nonfiction accounts from fairly recent events like Iraq that were grim but useful. My heroine, Dr. Emily Shane, is known as the “Angel of Fantalar” for her deeds in frontline combat, but she’s quite self-critical for not being able to save everyone. The cruise ship is a totally new environment for her and in the beginning she’s not sure how well she’ll fit with pampered passengers. Most of the crew members are military veterans like her, however, and she finds common ground with them.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you?

I can’t usually quantify how I arrive at my character’s names – I just like the ‘sound’ and my Muse kind of goes “Oh yes, your heroine’s name is Emily and your hero is Jake,” as in this case, and I start writing. Actually, when it comes to names, I had more of a process for how to name my cruise ships. I researched what sort of names the modern day ocean-going ships tend to have and I decided to use the world “nebula” as the first half of the title, and also in my head, as a class of luxury interstellar cruise liner. For the second word of the names, I went with something more ethereal and evocative – “dream” for my original novel and “zephyr” for this one.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

Veronica's Influences: Forbidden Planet and Flash Gordon

Veronica’s Influences: Forbidden Planet and Flash Gordon

Since my Dad loved science fiction, one of the first movies I ever remember seeing (on late night TV) was “Forbidden Planet,” so I guess you could say I was imprinted with scifi early on. The local TV station also broadcast the old episodes of the 1930’s “Flash Gordon” serial with Buster Crabbe daily and as a little kid I was blind to the outdated production techniques and acting, and totally enthralled with the stories. In fact, I keep a framed photo from one of the Flash episodes next to my writing desk and a small Robby the Robot on my bookcase as reminders of my scifi ‘roots’. But I always felt there needed to be more romance in everything scifi, so I supply that element in my writing.

I’m also fascinated by disasters and how people act and react, going back to the fact that my mother’s family had a belief that one of their distant relatives survived the Titanic as a second class passenger. Living in the age of the internet, I’ve come to sadly accept that the lady probably wasn’t related to us, despite the unusual surname, but the story still inspired me. I’ve also always been drawn to medical mysteries, especially the work of epidemiologists tracking down outbreaks, so it was a nice extra to be able to include some of that mystery in this novel. My father was one of the few people in the country to contract and survive a certain disease as a young child, thoroughly mystifying the medical authorities of his time, and the story of how they eventually tracked it back to the source fascinated me.

What makes you laugh? Currently?

My brand new grandbaby, the antics of my cats and certain episodes of the “Big Bang Theory” TV show.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

I’m not aware of anything special I do to remain sane as a writer. I just am one and I write like I breathe. I don’t even try to explain the process by which my Muse (or subconscious) generates my fiction. I do believe very strongly as a human being in never giving up, no matter the situation, but also looking for unusual or different ways to problem solve if the straight ahead approach isn’t working. My characters very much do that. They don’t panic in the crisis, they’re hopeful and they believe in romance and the Happy Ever After, just as I do!

She saved countless soldiers in the wars … but does she have the weapons to fight an outbreak?
Dr. Emily Shane, veteran of the Sector Wars, is known as “The Angel of Fantalar” for her bravery under fire as a medic. However, the doctor has her own war wounds–severe PTSD and guilt over those she failed to save.

Persuaded to fill a seemingly frivolous berth as ship’s doctor on the huge and luxurious interstellar cruise liner Nebula Zephyr, she finds the job brings unexpected perks–a luxe beach deck with water imported from Tahumaroa II, and Security Officer Jake Dilon, a fellow veteran who heats her up like a tropical sun.

However, Emily soon learns she and Jake didn’t leave all peril behind in the war. A mysterious ailment aboard the Zephyr begins to claim victim after victim … and they must race against time and space to find the cause and a cure! Trapped on a ship no spaceport will allow to dock, their efforts are complicated by a temperamental princess and a terrorist–one who won’t hesitate to take down any being in the way of his target. If anyone’s left when the disease is through with them…

Buy Star Cruise: Outbreak: Apple iBooks,  Amazon, Kobo or Barnes & Noble

Author Veronica Scott

Author Veronica Scott

Best Selling Science Fiction & Paranormal Romance author and “SciFi Encounters” columnist for the USA Today Happily Ever After blog, Veronica Scott grew up in a house with a library as its heart. Dad loved science fiction, Mom loved ancient history and Veronica thought there needed to be more romance in everything. When she ran out of books to read, she started writing her own stories.

Three time winner of the SFR Galaxy Award, as well as a National Excellence in Romance Fiction Award, Veronica is also the proud recipient of a NASA Exceptional Service Medal relating to her former day job, not her romances! She recently was honored to read the part of Star Trek Crew Member in the audiobook production of Harlan Ellison’s “The City On the Edge of Forever.”

You can learn more about Veronica Scott by checking out her Blog, her Amazon Author Page, and by following her on Twitter or Facebook.

Interview with a Fangirl: Megan


I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is a great pleasure to interview fellow Fangirl, Megan, aka ‪@megzcull ‬via Twitter and Instagram. Megan is a Singer, Voice Teacher, Fangirl, Jedi, Ravenclaw – She love all things Star Wars, Harry Potter, and other nerdy things.

I became aware of Megan through the Star Wars Fan and Harry Potter Communities.

Welcome Megan to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl. It is an honor that you took the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

Probably in high school. I had always loved Sci Fi and Fantasy, but didn’t really know I was a “fan” until I was older. I didn’t even know about the term “Fangirl” until a few years ago!

How has social media helped or hindered you?

I would say it has helped me more than hindered me. It has opened up a whole new world! I am able to interact with fans all around the world who love the same things as I do. I love when we all “Fangirl” together over something. I have felt more accepted. Social media is really a powerful platform, and I try to keep it positive at all times. I think it’s really important that we stick together and support each other through social media to keep it as safe and fun as possible.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I first saw Star Wars when it was re-released in 1997. I knew about it and had glimpses of it, but didn’t know the scope of it until then. I remember being SO excited to see it and from the moment the words “A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away…” appeared on the screen, I was hooked! My other big fandom is Harry Potter. When the first movie came out, I saw it and became a huge fan right away. Then I delved into the books, which were just as amazing.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

Mostly what I have learned is the power of Star Wars. It connects people of all ages, races, locations, gender, etc… For the most part, the Star Wars fan community is really fantastic and positive. And SO creative and smart! I have interacted with incredibly talented people that offer their talent with Podcasts, art, music, writing, etc…

What else do you Fangirl about?

I’ve been singing and performing most of my life, so I’m a big fan of all kinds of music and musicals. Some of my favorite bands/artists are Muse, Queen, Kelly Clarkson, Sleeping at Last, Vitamin String Quartet. Some of my favorite musicals are Phantom of the Opera, Wicked, Fiddler on the Roof, Guys and Dolls.

I’m also a fan of Anime and my two favorites are Fullmetal Alchemist and Gundam Wing.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

I think it’s important to stay positive and be confident about what you love. Also, be welcoming to other people who are new to your fandoms. We are kind of unofficial ambassadors for our fandoms. It’s important to be open-minded about other opinions. That way, you can have fun and insightful discussions and maybe learn something in the process. Overall, just be kind. It will make your experience just better overall. I love being a fangirl!

Thanks again Megan for answering these questions and letting us get to know you better.

Interview with a Fangirl: Ash


I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is a great pleasure to interview fellow Fangirl, Ash, aka ‪@ErsatzAsh ‬via Twitter.

Fangirl Ash

I became aware of Ash through the Star Wars Fan Community and The Skyhoppers Podcast.

Welcome Ash to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl. It is an honor that you took the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When did you begin to realize you were a Fangirl?

I’ve always been very vocal about my love of nerdy things. I remember not being able to to shut up about Star Wars and Marvel when I was a kid and I still can’t (That’s why I have a Star Wars podcast). I think the realization that I was a fangirl happened my freshman year in high school. I discovered that I cared about these things a lot more than most of the population and like most confused fourteen year olds I desperately wanted to be accepted and I didn’t think I would be with my interests, so for about 6 months I tried to convince myself that I was more interested in football than Jedi ( I lived in Texas) and I was miserable. Then I found a wonderful group of friends that accepted me completely and eventually convinced me that it was OK to be unashamed about things I love. They introduced me to Tumblr and went on from there.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

It has helped me so much, I’ve met some of my best friends online and just having a community of people who love the same stuff I do is fantastic and now with the podcast we have an awesome community of listeners that we get to interact with. We are also in the Star Wars Commonwealth Podcast Network which is an amazing group of people I get to nerd out with daily.

When did you first see Star Wars and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

My first memory of Star Wars is when my Dad took me to Attack of The Clones and I almost immediately fell in love with everything about it. I think it made my family finally give up there crusade to get me to love Barbies, because every year after that I’ve received a Star Wars action figure for my birthday.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

I have discovered that Star Wars has had a tremendous impact on so many different people from every possible background and that people who would have normally never thought of initiating a conversation have formed life long friendships over a mutual love of Star Wars. I met one of my best friends because he came up to me at a comic book store and said he liked my Star Wars t-shirt.

What else do you Fangirl about?

Indiana Jones and Marvel Comics

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

Don’t feel even a miniscule amount of shame for the things you love. There will always be people who try to make you feel bad, but there will also be people who encourage and support you 100 percent!

Ash is a massive Star Wars fangirl and co-host of The Skyhoppers Podcast where they talk about anything and everything Star Wars related whether it’s Canon or not. Find out more via @SWSkyhoppers

Interview with a Fangirl: Amy Ratcliffe


I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is a great pleasure to interview writer, podcast co-host and fellow Fangirl, Amy Ratcliffe.


I first became aware of Amy through the Full of Sith Podcast and of course following her Fangirl adventures via Twitter.

Welcome Amy to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl. It is an honor that you took the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

Hmm. Probably in high school when I scoured Wheel of Time message boards and participated in a related roleplaying community. Or maybe later when I became addicted to a Battlestar Galactica fan group on Live Journal. I don’t know if I can pinpoint the exact moment.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

Social media has definitely helped me find likeminded individuals. One of the reasons I signed up for Twitter was to connect with other ladies who also enjoyed Star Wars. I ended up meeting all of my closest friends (who are local to me) on Twitter first. It’s made it easier for me to get to know others at conventions because I’ve already established an online relationship of sorts with them.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I first saw Star Wars when I was in high school. I was 16. My high school boyfriend wanted to see the rereleases in the theater, and I was curious. I loved them, but I didn’t fall head over heels in love with Star Wars until many years later when Star Wars: The Clone Wars debuted.
My first sci-fi experience was Star Trek: The Next Generation, and though I enjoyed it, I never latched onto Star Trek like I did with Star Wars.
My first fandom was probably Wheel of Time. I picked up those books early in high school and devoured them. I later joined fan sites – I think one was called the White Tower – and devoured theories. I longed to be an Aes Sedai.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

The Star Wars fan community constantly enriches me. For the most part, it’s a positive and energetic group that discusses and creates. The creativity always astounds me, whether it’s a theory I’ve never considered before or seeing handmade costumes and models. They inspire me to be welcoming and to do my part to contribute positivity.

What else do you Fangirl about?

Oh man. Fangirling about Star Wars takes up a lot of my energy and free time, but I’m also quite enthusiastic about: Disney, Disneyland, Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit, Supernatural, Battlestar Galactica, Harry Potter, most shows on The CW, and Doctor Who.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

Never be afraid to express yourself about what you like. Don’t suffer fools or gatekeepers. Most importantly, have fun.

Amy Ratcliffe is a writer and geek passionate about Star Wars, Disney, and coffee. You can find her work at Nerdist, StarWars.com, IGN and in Star Wars Insider magazine. Follow her fangirl adventures via Twitter or Instagram.

Interview with a Fangirl: Caz


I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is a great pleasure to interview fellow Fangirl, Caz Gardiner aka @radioryloth on Twitter.


I became aware of Caz through the Star Wars Fan Community. Especially through the articles she writes for the fan site, FutureoftheForce.com.

Welcome Caz to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl. It is an honor that you took the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

Thanks for the opportunity!

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

I think I was always a fangirl for something! It hasn’t always been Star Wars (although that was always in the background during my childhood.) It’s been music, various TV shows, books, even historical periods sometimes. I’ve always consistently been fascinated by science fiction and utopia/dystopia situations in fiction. I think over the last 5 years I realised I was in deep with Star Wars, I started getting really geeky about the details lots of people weren’t interested in so I guess that’s when I knew!!

How has social media helped or hindered you?

I’m quite new to Twitter and I’m finding it a good experience so far. I use it to chat about the things I’m passionate about, keep up with announcements and read articles, although I should probably spend less time on that and more time on my own writing, or reading books! It’s nice to reach out and connect to people that share my interests.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings,
etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I saw Star Wars when I was a kid and we used to watch it repeatedly, its just always been there, I never questioned whether I liked it or not. The prequels I saw at the cinema. I guess that universe has grown on me over time to the point I’ve reached now. The turning point was probably watching The Clone Wars for the first time and just getting totally obsessed with it.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has
had a positive impact on your life?

It’s really nice to realise it’s not just me getting frustrated about some aspects of Star Wars. I’m happy to see lots of people speaking up about representation, both in the stories themselves and within the visible fan community, and it has given me the confidence to raise my voice too.

What else do you fangirl about?

Doctor Who, X-Files, Battlestar Galactica, Fringe, Buffy, Angel, Harry Potter, Dystopian fiction, 80’s cartoons, lots of different types of music.

About Caz Gardiner

Caz lives in London is a mum, cellist, sometimes guitarist and singer, feminist, aspiring teacher, writes about Star Wars as Radio Ryloth for futureoftheforce.com. You can follow her via Twitter @radioryloth or Facebook http://www.facebook.com/radioryloth.

Interview with an Author: Cynthia Sax

It is a pleasure to welcome Cynthia Sax author of Hers To Command.

Welcome Cynthia to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

Cynthia Sax: Thanks for having me Patty. I’m excited to be here.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

Cynthia Sax: Carys, the heroine of Hers To Command, is a battle station Commander. She has a genetic anomaly that makes her compatible with TWO cyborg warriors. They will do anything to claim her, to keep her safe. Ace and Thrasher are truly Hers To Command.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you?
If so, give a few examples…

Cynthia Sax: Carys, the heroine of Hers To Commander, is a tolerates-no-backchat type of Commander. Her crew don’t use her first name. I doubt they know it. They refer to her as Commander. I liked that she, a female many perceive as tough and strong, had a soft, feminine name. That shows the two sides of her. In public, she’s tough. In private, she has a soft heart.

Ace and Thrasher are cyborgs, half man, half machine. Cyborgs are viewed as weapons, as objects by their manufacturers. They’re given model numbers, not names. They choose their own names.

Ace is the more logical warrior, more machinelike than human. He chose a name that reflects excellence. It is also short, practical. Thrasher is the more emotional, more human warrior. His name conveys movement and emotion, specifically passion and frustration.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

Cynthia Sax: I’m a long time cyborg romance reader. I love the delicious cyborg stories told by Laurann Dohner and Eve Langlais. I felt I had my own unique stories to add to this amazing niche.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

Cynthia Sax: I think it is very important that we write what WE want to write. Yes, we can try to make our stories a bit more marketable but we should love them. We should find joy in what we’re writing. Our happiness is the only thing we can truly control in this wonderful business.

The cyborg series is a prime example of that. When I proposed the idea of Releasing Rage to my agent, she didn’t want to shop it around. She said there was no market for it.

I wrote it anyway, Indie published it and it is, by far, my best selling story. I truly believe my passion for the niche shows. Readers feel the love.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

Cynthia Sax: I do quite a bit of research for every story. Very little of it, ironically, is put on the page. But I consult with scientists and engineers and, of course, Google is a good friend of mine (grins).

I like to know everything in my stories is plausible. Maybe it isn’t the norm. Writing about what usually happens can be creatively restrictive, not-very-exciting and a bit predictable. But it COULD happen.

For Hers To Command, specifically, I did quite a bit of research on air battles, on battle strategy, on the gravity fields around planets and moons, on whether or not a cow would venture into a dark, cool cave (that is rare but it happens). My search history is a mess. (grins)

What makes you laugh?

Cynthia Sax: I LOVE truly bad jokes, especially puns. I’m PUNderful. One of my great joys is finding the perfect bad dirty jokes for my newsletters. They’re unabashedly awful. If you don’t groan while reading them, I haven’t done my job properly.

What makes you cry?

Cynthia Sax: Oh boy. What doesn’t? In romance novels, it is that tough heroine trying her best not to cry, fighting a losing battle against the tears. Or a hero who feels he has failed his female in some way. That gets me.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

Cynthia Sax: One of the earliest books I fangirled over was Felix Salten’s Bambi. I must have read that library book a hundred times. Coming from the country, being a farm girl, the honesty of that story got to me. Bad things happened in the story, just as I saw it happen all around me in nature. But there was still hope. There was still optimism.

That is what I try to convey in the cyborg series. My cyborg world is dark. Bad things happen. But there’s optimism. There’s love. There’s hope.

Hers To Command

Three Battered Hearts. One Perfect Love

Ace and Thrasher share a special bond. They’ve never acknowledged that connection and have never fully acted on it. The Humanoid Alliance kill cyborg males like them, deeming the warriors to be defective. Now that Ace and Thrasher have escaped, they don’t trust the cyborg council and their brethren to react any differently. Physical love is too risky for them to consider.

Until they meet her.

Carys is the Commander of a Rebel Battle Station. She has dedicated her lifespan to seeking vengeance against the Humanoid Alliance and the cyborgs who killed her daughter. On her battle station, she makes the rules, and if she wants to kiss, touch, and pleasure two mysterious warriors, she will. Nothing, not even enemy warships and a mass cyborg rebellion, can stop her.

In the midst of a war, enemies can become lovers and loyalties can change in a moment. Can a forbidden relationship between two cautious cyborgs and one unbending human Commander survive?

Hers To Command is Book 8 in the Cyborg Sizzle series.
Due to the number of returning characters in this story, you’ll enjoy Hers To Command more if you’ve read the other stories first. This is a MMF BBW Cyborg SciFi Romance and is available through the following outlets:

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About Cynthia Sax

USA Today bestselling author Cynthia Sax writes SciFi, contemporary and paranormal erotic romances. Her stories have been featured in Star Magazine, Real Time With Bill Maher, and numerous best of erotic romance top ten lists.
Sign up for her dirty-joke-filled release day newsletter and visit her on the web at www.CynthiaSax.com

Website: CynthiaSax.com
Newsletter: http://tasteofcyn.com/2014/05/28/newsletter/
Facebook: facebook.com/cynthia.sax
Twitter: @CynthiaSax
Blog: TasteOfCyn.com

Interview with a Fangirl: Clair

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!


Today, it is a great pleasure to interview fellow Fangirl, Clair Henry aka @henrytowers on Twitter.

I became aware of Clair through the Star Wars Fan Community.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

I probably I realised I was a fangirl when I went to secondary school around the age of 11 years old; (I think it’s called high school in the USA). Whilst at primary school (elementary school) I had a group of friends mainly boys who each break and lunchtime played or talked about star wars mainly, but we did like other things such as Battlestar Galactica, Flash Gordon, Superman and Wonder Woman anything sci fi, fantasy or comic based really. I loved it we played role play games, looked at comics, played with the toys, read books, collected the trading cards and stickers you name it we did it!

When I went to an all-girls secondary school and had to make new friends I realised that not many people liked the things I liked! It didn’t stop me; it was difficult though as in the early 1980s in Northern Ireland it was hard there was one comic shop in Belfast that you could go to get your fangirl (or guy for that matter fix! It was so expensive!!!!!)

All through my life I haven’t ever shied away from the fact that I like Star Wars or anything related to sci fi and as people have got to know me they accept it think its quirky and respect me for it!

I’m still best friends with my primary school friend, now his family and mine go together to conventions!

How has social media helped or hindered you?

I would say it has helped me. I loved StarWars.com from its infancy and joined hyperspace on it! The forums and communities before modern social media helped me keep up to date or in contact with other people who loved star wars.

I am now on facebook, twitter and instagram. I find twitter the best for finding out snippets of information from a range of sources almost as soon as it happens! I love the fact on facebook groups of like-minded people can come together and chat.

I try to look at them a couple of times of the day, but try not to let it take over my life which I know social media can do, it’s very addictive!!

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Ring, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

My parents always said I loved strange TV shows and movies from a young age, I saw Star Wars in 1978 when it came to Northern Ireland when I was 5 and I loved it! My mum always tells people when they ask her “Has Clair always loved Star Wars?” Her reply is “Yes when her dad and granddad brought her home from the cinema and she pretended to stop a rubbish crusher from closing in on her and called herself Princess Leia I knew this film was a hit !”

I remember choosing to watch Star Trek, Battlestar, the black and white Flash Gordon Saturday morning shows, Wonder Woman and the cartoon Lord of The Rings over anything else on the TV I simply couldn’t get enough of it!

That love has still continued I love to watch anything of the fangirl genre from lost, the remake battlestar, Game of Thrones to the dc and avenger films and tv shows over anything else.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

It was different for a girl to like Star Wars when I was young it was a “boy” thing and there weren’t many “out” fangirls around. I was considered by some to be nerdy, Tomboyish and weird as I didn’t conform to the norm as such in my tastes, but I was always comfortable and strong with my choice and that was because of the support I got from the Star Wars friends I suppose you could call them my fan community right from the start as a child
As an adult, the fan community has allowed me to continue my love for star wars and has helped me show others that its ok to like what you like and be proud of it ( even when it’s not trendy or in vogue which star wars was for a very long time)

What else do you Fangirl about?

My daughter loves Harry Potter so I have learned an awful lot about that series recently. Its great to see Supergirl and Wonder Woman come back again! I loved the original program and movies and think the modern take on those are fantastic!

I’m not sure whether it’s a fangirl thing but I love Kylie Minogue the pop singer and have yet to miss a tourher music I find is very upbeat and always gets me on the dance floor!!!

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

I love being a fangirl as there isn’t a typical or prescribed way to do it! I love the fact that every day I can somehow show off my love of Star Wars in my own fangirl way whether it be by wearing a pin on my work Lanyard, heading out for a night of cocktails by carrying my Star Wars makeup in my black Darth Vader handbag, or turning up to a meeting and produce my Star Wars note book and pen to take notes and minutes. It always starts a conversation and I feel it breaks down a lot of barriers as people can’t help but ask why or do you like Star Wars!

Being a fangirl is simply the best feeling and I am so proud to call myself one.

May The Force Be With You…

Interview with a Fangirl: Michelle

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is a great pleasure to interview fellow Fangirl, Michelle, aka Missy K’ya!

Fangirl Missy

Fangirl Michelle

I became aware of Michelle via the Skywalking Through Neverland Podcast and through interactions with her via Facebook.

Welcome Michelle to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl. Thank you for taking the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

I suppose I have been a Fangirl since I was 9 years old. I know that, at that age, I didn’t realize that I was a Fangirl (or that there was such a thing). All I knew was that I was completely obsessed with Star Wars. I did realize that I was the only girl in my school that was passionate about it, but I simply didn’t care what anyone else thought. By the time I was about 12 or 13 I realized that “fandom” was a thing, and that I was certainly a part of it.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

Social media was non-existent during my childhood, teens, and early adulthood. We met other fans at comic book stores, lining up for new Star Wars film releases (yes, even back then), or just through mutual friends. Since the rise of social media it has become so much easier to meet other fans, which is great ! I find that when there is some new, exciting Star Wars news that the people around me do not really care about, I can just turn to my social media friends and they are always there to share in my excitement.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Ring, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I saw A New Hope when it was first released in the theater. I had just turned 6 years old and it was love at first sight. I grew up in San Francisco and saw the movie at the Coronet Theater, which I was able to do for every single Star Wars film until The Force Awakens. Unfortunately, the theater closed before then and I was devastated. Now I have to see Star Wars films in other places, but the love remains. I believe my love for all things Star Wars continues to grow, and probably always will.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

I have learned that there are so many people out there that feel the same way I do, and that these people come from so many different places, ethnicities, religions, and political points of view. Regardless of how different fans may be, we all share something. Through the connections we make in our fandom communities I have seen that we can respect each other’s differences and not judge each other based on those differences or points of view. I find fellow fans to be far more accepting than other people in general. It seems that knowing what we share helps us to respect our differences.

What else do you Fangirl about?

Disney, Harry Potter, Twilight, Star Trek, LOTR, and Stranger Things.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

I just want to express how happy I am that it has become much more acceptable for girls to be a part of the fandom communities. This generation is able to enjoy being fans regardless of their gender.

Thank so much Michelle for stopping by and letting us get to know you and your fandom better.

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Michelle is a Northern California Fangirl mother and grandmother raising a 6 year old Fangirl with autism. You can connect with Missy K’ya via her Facebook or Instagram as a_mommy_and_a_mimi.

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