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Interview with Author: Elizabeth Bromke

It is a pleasure to welcome Elizabeth Bromke author of Christmas on Maplewood Mountain (Book One in the Maplewood Sisters Series).

Welcome Elizabeth to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

Thank you, Patty! I’m really excited for this.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

Christmas on Maplewood Mountain is set in a tiny, fictional mountain town in Arizona. I, too, live in a small mountain town in Arizona, although it’s not Maplewood. However, I was born and raised in Tucson, a desert. Growing up, I always missed the seasons. In fact, fall leaves and snow were the stuff of fantasies for me, except for when my family would visit cooler climates. So, when my husband and I moved up to the mountains, I became a keen observer of “mountain life,” and I fell in love. I wanted to build a world in Maplewood, and one good way to do that was to create a family. I come from a very big family, and so the idea of four sisters and two brothers is based on my aunts and uncles. Fun fact: my dad has one brother and four sisters, and my mom has three sisters and two brothers. The Delaneys of Maplewood echo that dynamic.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

Some characters’ names or places are mini dedications to my family members. The characters are not based on real people, but I liked the idea of honoring them in a small way in the series. For example, I used my mom’s name for the bakery owner.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I have yet to meet a genre I didn’t like. I have a voracious appetite for reading. And, I’ve been writing since I was a young child. When I was a little girl, I wrote stories about big families with complicated (and confusing!) family dynamics. As I (hopefully) matured in my writing, I never shook the desire to explore relationships. Romance lends itself very well to this exploration. Plus, I love happy endings!

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

I feel less myself when I’m not engaging in creative pursuits. To me, sanity is synonymous with writing. It absorbs my anxieties. But, really the main condition of my contentment and happiness is… you guessed it! Family. In the book, even though they arrive at a major conflict in their sisterhood, Mary and Anna Delaney love each other and their siblings and parents deeply. Family is a driving force.

What makes you laugh?

It’s one of two extremes. I either laugh at the same things that 13-year-old boys laugh at or really smart humor.  My favorite TV show, however, is The Office. I’m not quite sure where it falls on that spectrum.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I am a huge fan of a variety of books/movies/people. For example, my favorite movies are The Wizard of Oz and Silence of the Lambs. I also love TitanicJaws, and Beetlejuice. Batman is my favorite superhero, and The Dark Knight is another favorite movie. Favorite books include Dracula, The Hunger Games, and anything by Jodi Picoult. I love psychological thrillers, too. Finally, I have a bizarre interest in Lizzie Borden of hatchet fame. My first historical fiction pieces revolve around her story.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

Readers can find me on website, elizabethbromke.com, my facebook author page, Elizabeth Bromke or on twitter @ElizabethBromke. Joining my newsletter is a surefire way to stay up-to-date with exclusive news and promotions. You can join here!

Christmas on Maplewood Mountain (Book One in the Maplewood Sisters Series) – releasing Saturday, November 17, 2018!

It’s December, and Mary Delaney has little to show for her tenth year at Wood Smoke Lodge. Her business has been steadily dwindling. Her relationship prospects, too. But, her sister, Anna, has an idea that just might change Mary’s luck. Unfortunately, their own sisterhood might be working against them. Worst of all, it’s all coming to a head during the holidays, making Mary feel lonelier than ever.

Meanwhile, Kurt Cutler is living the high life in the tech world. Fresh on the heels of wild success in the uncharted world of cryptocurrency, he looks for a way to ensure his young company doesn’t lose its grip. When his right-hand woman suggests a get-away at her sister’s snowy mountain retreat, he jumps on the opportunity to unplug and unwind.

If Mary’s sister, Anna, can back off, Mary has every chance of enjoying the magic of the holidays. But when Mary and Kurt have to choose between love and their own priorities, what will win?

Find out if a wintry weekend can become more for people from two opposite worlds in Elizabeth Bromke’s cozy romance, Christmas on Maplewood Mountain.

Interview With Author Tessa McFionn

It is a pleasure to welcome Tessa McFionn author of The Rise of the Stria series.

Welcome Tessa to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

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What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

My latest series, The Rise of the Stria, is a space opera which has been spinning in my mind for many years now. I pitched the first book, To Discover a Divine, as The Wizard of Oz meets Star Wars. At the time, the work was entitled Lost in Transmigration, but the feedback on the title was less than anticipated. Seems people thought, by the title, this was going to be a comedy, or at least a light rom-com. And that would be a big negative there, Ghost Rider. So, after several heart-to-hearts with my wonderful publishing team at Fiery Seas Publishing, we came up with the current title. The story centers around a human, Evainne Wagner, who gets sucked into another galaxy only to find out she is some sort of mystical savior eluded to in an ancient prophecy, and it will follow her as she learns of her role and navigates the intense attraction to our hero, a captain in the Strian rebel forces, Kahlym cal Jheun.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

Ah, the names. Actually, I find myself discovering new character names in the oddest of ways. One fun way is watching the credits at the ends of movies. I have always stayed until the bitter end in the theater. Sometimes because I wanted to know who sang a particular song or where a movie was shot, but during the wait, I would read the names. My husband and I actually play a game where we try to find the funniest, or longest, or coolest name in the credits. By watching all the names scroll by, my author brain is on high alert for the next hero, heroine, villain or sidekick in the long list. But, in the case of my sci-fi, it was a little different. For my heroine, I have always loved the name Evainne. I first heard it in Neil Gaiman’s work, Starlight, and I just loved it. As to the aliens, those are tough. I mean, you don’t really think you’re going to come across a spaceman named Bob, right? I wanted to make the names look exotic, but still be pronounceable. So, Callum became Kahlym and Darrin became Dhaerin. For the others, don’t laugh, but I stared at my keyboard and started with one letter then built the names up from there. Granted, this is a very trial and error method. I thought to myself, what kinds of word sounds made me think happy thoughts and which sounded evil. I tried to give my good guys soothing sounds while the harsher tones were aimed toward the bad guys. Like I said, I know it sounds silly, but it works for me.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I have been a nerd for the whole of my life. My mother used to read to me and my brother when we were little. She read anything and everything. We heard The Yearling, Old Yeller, Jaws, (LOL! Yes, I heard the story before the movie was made) and The Hobbit. I remember when my grandmother gave me a copy of Robert Heinlein’s Starship Troopers. I was in the fourth grade and I was so excited. The opening line used the word “xenomorph” and I had to read the rest of it with the dictionary next to me. But I didn’t care. I was hooked. I am old enough to say that I was there the day they released Star Wars in the theaters. I remember looking over my shoulder when the space ship zoomed in from off-camera, cheering for the good guys and booing Darth Vader. After that, I continued to devour all things fantastical. I read Asimov, Bradbury, all of the Dune books. My mother even enrolled me in the Science Fiction/Fantasy Book of the Month club, which is why I dedicate each and every book I write to her memory. She is my biggest inspiration and was my most steadfast supporter, even though she never had a chance to read my works.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

Wait, we have to be sane to do this?! Nobody told me that!!! All kidding aside, for me, since I do have a full-time day job, it’s all about time management. It’s a bit of the “all work and no play” mentality. I try to make sure to get words on pages every day, but I try, she said incredulously, I try NOT to beat myself up if I don’t. I personally tend to be rather scattered. Yes, I am a pantser and can get distracted by shiny objects. (Just ask my hubby. He calls it my magpie complex.) So, I create characters who can think on their feet and multitask like it’s cool. I don’t really have any strongly organized characters just yet, only because I’m not sure how to approach that myself.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

That’s the beauty about writing science fiction: not a whole lot of available information on a fictitious part of the universe. If anything, I guess what you could call it is anti-research. It’s more about checking around to make sure your device/concept/planetary system isn’t already being used by someone else out there. But you still have to make things believable and relatable, and therein lies the rub. When I first started writing my space opera, I had the Alliance as the good guys, but that only sparked my memories of watching Firefly and Serenity, even though they were the bad guys in that world. So, after numerous synonym searches (thank you, thesaurus.com and my Flip Dictionary), I found a very distant cousin, twice removed on their mother’s side I would venture to guess. I rewatched lots of Star Trek reruns and Googled lots of ship components. But even then, things can go sideways. I was 90% done with the first draft and my ship’s three-armed tech/mechanic was named Warwick. I was so pleased with my somewhat obscure choice of names and took a break to read and POOF! There, as bold as day, was Warwick, out in print. So, back to the drawing board, a little switcharoo and Warwick becomes Falka, and the cleric, who was originally Falco, becomes Yhan’tu. Now, would others have made the connection? I don’t know, but if I want to set my stories apart, then maybe it means making some changes when needed.

What makes you laugh?

EVERYTHING!! I love to laugh. I consider myself to be more of an optimist than a pessimist, and I try to keep things on a positive note. This means lots of laughter and lots of smiles. My current go-to for a good giggle is a series of short videos called True Facts. OMG! If you haven’t seen these yet, they are just hysterical. They’re little nature videos about strange animals and they are just brilliant. The narrator reminds me a little of a young version of Morgan Freeman and he starts out so serious, but ends up cracking himself up throughout the episode with the facts or the videos of the animals. There is one about seahorses and he acquaints the way seahorses move to riding a skateboard and waving a Denny’s menu really fast to move. I believe that laughter is the best way to learn about people and to stay healthy.

What makes you cry?

Not much? I know, that makes me sound so heartless. But, like I said above, I try to be optimistic about things. But, if I am truly moved emotionally, I will shed a tear or two. This can happen when I see someone rise up against all odds and succeed, or when someone inspires others to rise up. For me, it’s all about the journey. I cry when I see the little kitties climb up from the edge of the abyss, or when I watch my students completely nail a performance in front of a packed house. I don’t cry in normal movies. I thought E.T. was boring and Terms of Endearment didn’t move me either. I also don’t watch sappy movies. LMAO! I know, I know! What kind of romance author am I?! But, I did cry when Spock died in Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan and when Gandalf fell in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

Since my life has surrounded the nerd culture for the whole of my life, I have lots of fandoms that influence me. I have also been surrounded by the performing arts and these have been woven into a couple of my heroines in my paranormal series. In my first book, Spirit Fall, my heroine is a dancer disillusioned with life and is brought down from the edge of suicide by a handsome hero. My third book in that same series, Spirit Song, tells of a torch singer held prisoner by a sleazy mobster in Chicago and finds an unlikely savior in a reluctant Guardian Warrior. It’s hard not to infuse some of yourself into your stories. Everyone does drink coffee. That is a requirement. I even found a way to make coffee appear in a different universe. It’s that serious.

Is there anything else you want to add about the story, series that has not already been mentioned?

This is only the beginning. I wrote To Discover a Divine with the idea of it only being a trilogy, but my muse wasn’t having any of that. So, this is the gateway to a whole new universe of tales from the Dantaran Galaxy and I hope to share many more stories as times goes on.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

I’m a bit old school and I really do like Facebook. However, that being said, I am on Twitter and Instagram as well. I answer emails, my semaphore and smoke signals are a bit weak, but I’d be willing to brush up on them if needed. Just drop by my website, my Amazon Author page or find me on the interwebs.

Interview with Author Lyndi Alexander

It is a pleasure to welcome Lyndi Alexander author of THE LOST CHORD.

Welcome Lyndi to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

THE LOST CHORD is a musical sequence of notes that can either heal or destroy a group of multi-dimensional universes in which our characters live. A prophesy from long ago tells that this chord may be produced by the vibration of seven souls—and the Conductor must find them all if he is to save everyone.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I’ve written young adult novels previously, but this one is special, because the heroine is on the autism spectrum. I’d raised one family and then remarried and ended up with three children on the spectrum, two boys with Asperger’s and a daughter with more “traditional” autistic traits. In this book, I was able to model Bee Warrick after my daughter Tasha, who not only educates the other teens on her fantasy adventure but also the readers of the book on the happy surprises that can come from being different, but not less than, neurotypical people.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

I’ve been a published writer for over 40 years, and I’m not sure I really am sane, at this point. LOL! But I’ve been a single mom, and a law student, and a newspaper reporter, and a lawyer, and I’ve always needed to be strong and put myself out there. I think my characters—particularly the women in the Pittsburgh Lady Lawyers series—do reflect that need to overcome obstacles and make things happen.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

I had to learn about musical chords and composition and also string theory! It was a big stretch. Fortunately, they make an Idiot’s Guide to both.

What makes you laugh?

Watching toddlers enjoying themselves, giggling. Especially with puppies.

What makes you cry?

Watching Gandalf disappear over that ledge in Lord of the Rings. Kills me every time.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I’m a serious nerd, so all things fantasy and sci-fi. Writing as Lyndi Alexander, I’ve written a number of each category, and I do try to Easter-egg some things in each story that other nerds will appreciate.

Is there anything else you want to add about the story, series that has not already been mentioned?

The book may have an autistic heroine, but the story is told through the eyes of five other characters as well, including Cory Briggs, who’s a serious gamer and plays in a garage band with his friends, and Devlynn Kayne, who comes from a planet where blacks are the majority. Both boys and girls can find a character to reflect their point of view, and someone to identify with.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

They can leave word at my Facebook page, at Goodreads or email me at lyndialexander at gmail dot com. You can learn more about my latest release by viewing the Book trailer or visting THE LOST CHORD buy link page.

Interview with Author Catherine Cerveny

It is a pleasure to welcome Catherine Cerveny author of the Felicia Sevigny series.

Welcome Catherine to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

All the novels in the Felicia Sevigny series refer to luck. In the first book, we learn that the main character has a weird genetic quirk known as the luck gene that essentially ensure events always go in her favor—even when things seem to be going badly for Felicia. In the first novel, she learns there are rules for the luck gene, hence the title THE RULE OF LUCK. But it also refers to the fact that her life is controlled and ruled by luck—she just never realized it. In the second book, THE CHAOS OF LUCK, she hopes things will run more smoothly for her, but they don’t. The luck gene throws all her careful plans, including her love life, into chaos and makes her feel like luck’s pawn. In the third and final novel of the trilogy, THE GAME OF LUCK, Felicia finally asserts control over her life. She refuses to be used like a chess piece and is determined to take charge rather than be used and manipulated by those in her life, and by her own luck gene. If luck sees her life as a game, she’s determined to win it once and for all.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

I love it when the characters’ names mean something or there’s some hidden mystery behind them, although I don’t always go out of my way to make it happen when I’m selecting names. Sometimes, I just like how the name sounds or looks on the page. In the case of THE GAME OF LUCK, Felicia’s name means “lucky” and since this book was about a woman who discovers she has a luck gene, I thought the name was really appropriate. As for the male lead Alexei Petriv, the name Alexei means “helper and defender of mankind” which I thought was a great fit given his overall character arc. At the beginning of the series, he’s a very flawed character, merely following orders as he pushes the Tsarist Consortium’s agenda regardless of what it might mean to humanity’s future. He sees himself as being set apart from humanity but not of it. However by the end, he is transformed into someone who wants to protect what it means to be human and take a role in determining its destiny.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I’ve always loved science fiction—and space in general. I love the “what if” questions sci-fi poses and the mysteries it explores. Are there really aliens out there? What are other planets like and can we live on them? What would it take a terraform another planet? How would we get there? I also love the action and adventure angle, where characters were actually doing something instead of standing around and talking. Plus I love seeing characters fall in love in such adverse conditions, watching their relationship form in a pressure cooker, so to speak. When I was a kid growing up, I was exposed to a lot of action and adventure movies—Star Wars of course, but also Star Trek, and Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Spider-man, Doctor Who, and so on. I read comics and played with action figures (by the way, Barbie and Han Solo can totally get married if they want to). I wanted to go to Narnia and Camelot and Fantasia, or anywhere that wasn’t ordinary life. So, I would have to say I was inspired to write in the science fiction genre by a childhood spent indulging my imagination and always wondering “what if”.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

In The Game of Luck, I actually spent a lot of time researching dogs. I wanted Felicia and Alexei to have a dog, though I don’t have one myself—I seem to be allergy to everything these days. Given that I don’t know very much about dogs, I spent a lot of time researching dog breeds and behaviors, and asking friends to share their funny dog stories. So while I was researching planet terraforming and genetic manipulation, I was also trying to decide what sort of dog I wanted my characters to have—a Russian spaniel, by the way.

What makes you laugh?

My sense of humor is pretty dry and sarcasm is my go-to-move. I love wry, self-aware humor that’s a little off-beat and out in left field. You may not get it right away and you might have to work for it, but once you do, it’s that much more enjoyable. One of my favorite TV shows of all-time is the US version of “The Office”, which not everyone gets or finds funny, but I adore. I think that same wry sense of humor is in my novels, or I like to imagine it is.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

The best way to interact with me is probably on Twitter. I’m on there most often. I just started with Instagram so the landscape there is pretty dry and dusty, but I’m trying to remember to post things there as well. Readers can also reach me through the contact form on my website. And of course, I’m on Goodreads and be reached there as well. I do have a Facebook page where I post things, but it’s more for family and close friends.

Interview with an Author: Michelle M. Pillow

It is a pleasure to welcome Michelle M. Pillow author of Space Lords 4: His Earth Maiden.

Welcome Michelle to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

Thank you for having me!

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

The Space Lords series was a series installment in the sci-fi romance Qurilixen World collection. It came naturally as the characters from previous series (Dragon Lords, Lords of the Var) began leaving their planet for the high skies. The titles of the Space Lords series has to do with a curse the pirate crew received while “visiting” a planet. Each part of the curse relates to a different element on that planet, thus: His Frost Maiden, His Fire Maiden, His Metal Maiden, His Earth Maiden. Wood will be the next element.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I started writing historical romances and thought I would never do anything else. In 2004, after my first book a Regency ghost story romance, the publisher contacted me because they needed authors to fill out their Sci Fi Romance list. I agreed with the idea that I’d do this one thing for them, and then get to back to historical “my true passion.” Those first Sci Fi books, Dragon Lords, a futuristic dragonshifter series, grew into the Quirlixen World collection with 34 books within 7 series installments and growing.

It’s comical to think of now since I don’t write historical much anymore. My career took off from there, and I now I’m best known for futuristic, sci-fi and paranormal romance. However, I’ve written in a lot of different genres—contemporary, historical, fantasy, paranormal, urban fantasy, etc—and have recently released my third cozy mystery.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

It’s doing things away from the computer to refill the creative well. Often, that is when the best ideas strike, or I’ll be doing research for a book. Experiencing something makes you better versed to write it. Not that I can take off into spaceships, but I can tour a ghost town like what is in my newest cozy mystery, or I can interview an expert in paranormal investigations on their techniques, or climb Mayan Temples in Belize.

What makes you laugh?

I love to laugh. My husband and I joke around all the time. Usually it’s the silliest stuff.

What makes you cry?

Grey’s Anatomy. Everyone kept recommending it so I recently binge watched it and I think I cried like every episode. My husband probably thought something was seriously wrong with me. LOL

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I absolute LOVE horror movies. Scary, campy, phycological, it doesn’t matter. I have some darker books, the series Tribes of the Vampire, that does reflect a horror quality. I’d love to be able to write a straight thriller or horror if time allowed.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

I love talking to my readers online. They can usually find me on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Michelle M. Pillow, Author

NYT & USAT Bestselling Author Michelle M. Pillow is an award-winning romance writer with over 100 published books over the course of her nearly 15-year career. She is best known for her Quirlixen World including the series: Dragon Lords, Space Lords, Lords of the Var, Galaxy Alien Mail Order Brides, and more.

Michelle is always up for a new adventure or challenge, whether it’s a paranormal investigation of an old Vaudeville Theatre or climbing Mayan temples in Belize. She was a refugee extra on SyFy’s Z Nation (2016).

Website: www.michellepillow.com

Qurilixen World: https://michellepillow.com/dragonlords/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorMichellePillow/

Twitter: http://twitter.com/MichellePillow

Instagram: https://instagram.com/michellempillow/

Upcoming/Newest Release:

Better Haunts and Garden Gnomes, (Un)Lucky Valley Book 1, Cozy Mystery Paranormal Romantic Comedy

Available starting June 26, 2018

Welcome to Lucky Valley where nothing is quite what it seems.

Lily Goode wasn’t aware she had an inheritance waiting for her in the form of a huge Victorian house in Lucky Valley, Colorado. Life might finally be coming together for her. That is if you don’t count the endless home repairs, dealing with eccentric Aunt Polly who claims they’re both witches, and Nolan Dawson the handsome home inspector who seems to have it out for her, then, sure, life is grand. Oh, and not to mention the strange hallucinations and garden gnomes who are far more than lawn ornaments.

If mysterious accidents don’t do her in, then the rebellious gnomes just might. With the help of Aunt Polly, it’s up to Lily to discover who’s sabotaging her new home and trying to drive the Goodes out of Lucky Valley once and for all.

Interview with Author Amanda Cherry

It is a pleasure to welcome Amanda Cherry author of Rites & Desires.

Welcome Amanda to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

Thanks a Million for having me!

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

Rites & Desires is a distillation of what’s on the protagonist’s mind all the time. Ruby is obsessed with getting what she wants, the return of her lost magical powers most of all. And since the book is all about Ruby, I wanted the title to be a reflection of her inner world.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

The only character I got to name on my own was Arsho Barsamian, who is a minor character who I love in a major way. They are a genderfluid top-tier executive and part of the Armenian Diaspora. I think nonbinary people in positions of power aren’t often seen in fiction, so I gave them the name that means “Dawn” in Armenian, because I think of it as a beginning of a kind of representation that we don’t get enough of. Everyone else was already an existing character in the universe or in mythology.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

My book takes place in the Cobalt City universe of heroes and villains. I had read several earlier stories and was already a big fan of the characters when I was invited to submit to their short story anthology in 2015. The character of Ruby Killingsworth, who became my book’s protagonist, was loosely based on me when she was first seen in a story by Dawn Vogel. After my short story sold, and I had set Ruby on this course, I really wanted to see her through it. I was thrilled when DefCon One Publishing said yes!

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

There’s a balance to be struck between adequate focus to get things done, and being so hyper-focused you forget to brush your teeth or wash your kid’s clothes. Ruby is a champion of multitasking—I wish I were as good at it as she is. For me, sanity while writing (while drafting especially) lies in part in finding joy in your fictional world and being able to look forward to returning there day after day after day. Ruby is a practiced hedonist and she has a way of finding joy in every moment. If she’s not having a good time, she changes something until she is—and that’s a great metaphor for a story: if I’m not having a good time, the readers won’t either, and I should change something until it’s fun!

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

Most people who are familiar with me as a writer know that I cut my author-teeth writing fanfiction. So I am very accustomed to doing my research and having to get to know existing characters and their voices before sitting down to create a story. This book took things to a whole new level. There are multiple mythologies represented in this book. A Norse god is a featured character, and there are brushes with both Tibetan Buddhism and the Queen of Sheba. I had to spend oodles of time making sure I had things just so. I didn’t want to misrepresent anything with a basis in genuine tradition, so it was a lot of work—but it was worth it in the end. I’m very happy with the finished product.

What makes you laugh?

My four year-old. A good Star Wars joke. My dog.

What makes you cry?

The fact that my childhood best friend, my mom, and my lifelong hero aren’t here to read my book. Go out and create RIGHT NOW, people! Tomorrow could be too late for the people you love most to share it with you!

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I am a geek of the highest degree. I love Star Wars and Harry Potter the most, but my love for Star Trek: TNG. The X-Files, Buffy, and the West Wing have also spawned epic fannishness. I think I see a little of all of this in my writing. There’s definitely the kind of witty banter that my favorite characters are known for as well as elements of magic that you might find in the Buffyverse. There’s even a little politicking.

Is there anything else you want to add about the story, series that has not already been mentioned?

This is my debut novel and I am more than thrilled to be sharing this story with everyone. MY protagonist is objectively a villain, which is an interesting point of view from which to tell a story. I think it’s fresh and fun and I think people will enjoy it.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

I am super accessible! I am probably most easily reached via tweet @MandaTheGinger . I also have a Facebook Page, a Website: www.TheGingerVillain.com, an Amazon Author Page: www.amazon.com/author/amandacherry
and a Goodreads Page: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16099525.Amanda_Cherry

Amanda Cherry is a native of Pensacola, FL and an alumnus of UNLV who hasn’t been thoroughly warm since moving to the Seattle area in 2003. Amanda’s first love was performing, and she has had a successful career as a theatre, television, and film actress.

Amanda’s first book was penned in her family’s den and published by her father in time for Christmas in 1985, she was six years old. After the limited success of that first outing, Amanda turned to writing stories for fun. She spent the next twenty-odd years doing just that.

A lifelong nerd, Amanda joined the staff at her favorite Star Wars site, Tosche Station, as a contributing writer in 2016 and discovered that letting other people read what she’d written was actually pretty fun. Thanks to the encouragement of a friend, she was invited to submit to Cobalt City Christmas: Christmas Harder in 2016 while living overseas in Berlin, Germany. When she learned that her story was bought, she cried.

Interview with Author E.L. Roux

It is a pleasure to welcome E.L. Roux author of Unrequited Love, Book 1 of The Magic and Heartache series.

Welcome E.L. to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

The Magic and Heartache series is meant to be about characters who must overcome a past heartache in order to move on and find the HEA.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to? 

I read, a lot. And I’ve always love fantasy and science fiction romances, and I usually take from current events, and research projects to sculpt my stories. The idea for this series actually came from a thread from rainbow-femme tumblr rant about being sick of magical worlds not having coffee shops where you can get a shot of charisma before a big meeting, that and being asked to join an anthology group for Love Through Heartache, published in November 2017. I fell in love with the world I built, and the characters who lived in them, and had to write more.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

I think honesty and being loved for who you are, are very important attributes to being a better person, and staying sane, especially in today’s world, so I try and include those attributes into the characters I write, and the stories that I read.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others? 

I wanted to create a fantasy world where you’d meet characters that didn’t meet your normal fantasy expectations while creating new ones to introduce you to. I actually did a lot of research on Greek, Roman, and German gods and spirits, and loosely based some of my fantasy races off of them. For instance, I have Trolls in my story, but they aren’t the hulking ugly things you’ve read about before. And since the series books will be about novella length, I haven’t had the opportunity to reach further away from euro-centric gods, but I’m hoping to add more characters unique character types later.

What makes you laugh?

I’m a sucker for puns and silly jokes. I laugh at a lot actually, and often crack myself up, so at least I find myself funny even if no one else does. My goal is to reach the apex of dad-joke level (parent-joke level), but my pun game is severely lacking.

What makes you cry?

I’m a sucker for animal videos, and dance mobs, but reading wise, I love when a soul has been bared and torn open for us to experience their pain and watch as they rebuild themselves, usually with help, into a better person.

Is there anything else you want to add about the story, series that has not already been mentioned?

Unrequited Love will be re-released as a slightly expanded and re-edited stand alone novel on April 19!

The second book in the series will be out by the end of May!

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

My main author interaction is through Facebook, @ELRouxAuthor

Pre-Order Updated and revised Unrequited Love here.

Anthology Love Through Heartache, featuring Unrequited Love available via Amazon.

Interview With Author: Eva Caye

It is a pleasure to welcome Eva Caye author of the The To Be Sinclair series.

Welcome Eva to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

The To Be Sinclair series is about the greatest ruling family in the history of the galaxy, which means nobility. So I exemplify the ‘noble virtues’ or chivalrous code of honor in the titles, which describe the overall theme of the novel. The only one I couldn’t come up with to fit the brand was Evan’s Ladies; it was the first book made exclusively of novellas, although my most recent one, Integrity, consists of three novellas.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

Overall, I simply choose names I like. However, when the Sandy Hook massacre took place, a meme started floating around Facebook that said, “Here are the names of the victims so you won’t remember the names of their murderer.” I took that to heart and incorporated the first and last names, separately, into my next few books as tribute to them. They’re usually benevolent or highly responsible characters, like Sentinels, who are the equivalent of the FBI/Secret Service. I think I’ve gotten them all by now!

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I’ve always loved science fiction, but I chose to write science fiction romance because they’re two ends of a spectrum running from ‘intellectual objectivity’ to ‘emotional reaction’. I even wrote an article called, “Science Fiction Romance: the Ultimate Fusion!”, found here, to explain why I felt it was necessary to bring ‘the feels’ to science fiction. And, preferably, the good feels aka love! After all, even if you’re a brilliant mad scientist, the most important decision you can make in life is who you’ll spend it with.

My overall goal, however, is to write science fiction in a way that intrigues the romance crowd – not too heavy on the science, but with consistent explanations that might encourage a young lady to pursue science as a career, or that’ll leave a romance reader satisfied that these things are indeed quite plausible and can happen in the future.

I think I’ve particularly pegged the characterization of each scientist, though! I’m sure anyone who is married to a scientist will recognize their spouse in at least one of the characters!

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

I have no problem with ‘remaining sane’ as a writer. I do, however, incorporate a lot of psychology into my series, and several of my characters suffer depression like I do.

I rather object to depression being labeled a ‘mental illness’; there’s some real physical problem underlying it all, and I desperately hope someone figures it out soon. But, until then, I can at least write about how to deal with people suffering depression. In my most recent book, Integrity, I try to convey exactly what it’s like, and my editor praised me highly for it.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

I research all kinds of things, from black holes and quantum gravity to how ancient Greek royalty was addressed. Authors make a lot of jokes with each other about how long our NSA files must be, from Googling how far pieces of glass would fly if you used X amount of C4, or how big an explosion an atomic bomb makes if the atomic part doesn’t go off!

What makes you laugh?

Clever intellectual mash-ups, like Doctor Who songs or Star Trek/Star Wars mashups. I detest slapstick because I see nothing funny about inflicting pain or embarrassment on anyone.

What makes you cry?

Animal cruelty. I occasionally warn people on Facebook about how I block ‘friends’ who post it, and I’ve blocked four people so far.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

Oh, I’m always including my interests in my stories! I love to tat, so in one book I have a lady who tats cute little creatures for her friends, and eventually creates emblems for the Imperial Family. I have another lady ‘teach’ her boyfriend, the Crown Prince, how to lounge on a couch because he’s been raised ‘properly’ and needs to loosen up. She even introduces him to junk food!

Is there anything else you want to add about the story, series that has not already been mentioned?

The To Be Sinclair series spans three generations. The first two books are about the parents of the protagonists in the next six books, and the grandparents of everyone after that.

Otherwise, one of the main undercurrents is how women can fight their way out of a highly patriarchal society to achieve their dreams. My next (probably last) novel, Civility, will be over one of the daughters and one of the granddaughters, and it’ll be a declaration for women’s rights, as well as the rights of intelligent alien species!

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

I can always be reached by email, but I’ve been shying away from Facebook lately due to all the negativity.

Thanks again Eva for the interview!

Eva Caye, author of the To Be Sinclair series, can build a rocket stove, tat lace, handle a gun, design book covers and permaculture garden plans, and teach teenagers critical thinking. Her favorite activities include writing science fiction romance and playing with her doggie. She currently lives in a tiny, century-old farmhouse with her magnificent husband and a marvelous rescue mutt in Louisville, Kentucky.

Ways to connect with Eva:

Blog: http://evacaye.blogspot.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eva.caye
Author Central: http://amazon.com/author/evacaye
Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/evacaye
Payhip: http://payhip.com/evacaye
Twitter: https://twitter.com/EvaCaye
Google +: http://plus.google.com/u/0/106270772543621634687/posts

Interview with Author: Carmen Webster Buxton

It is a pleasure to welcome Carmen Webster Buxton author of Alien Bonds.

Welcome Carmen to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

The series is called Wakanreo because that’s the name I gave the alien world. The first book is called Alien Bonds because the protagonist finds herself tied to the world—and to one particular Wakanrean—in a way she never expected.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

I confess to a certain pettiness in that sometimes the bad guys are named after people I didn’t like, but other than that, I don’t tend to name characters with any scheme in mind. Mostly names pop into my head.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I loved science fiction and adventure stories when I was a kid, but when I look at the far future, I want something familiar, something I understand, so I add romance. Even my books that aren’t romances almost always have a love story or two. And I love reading about different cultures and customs, real or made-up. My favorite authors include Ursula LeGuin, Jane Austen, and Georgette Heyer.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

One reason I’m a writer is I want to control the story. I want the characters to say and do what I want. But left unchecked, this tendency can result in stories only I would want to read. So I have to be willing to listen to what other people think about my stories. Certainly, the more agreeable of my characters are willing to learn from others.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

In making the aliens very like humans, but still different, I had to decide what could be different and what should be the same. For example, I was going to give the aliens “cat-eyes” with vertical slit pupils but in reading about evolution, I discovered animals with slit pupils evolved as four-footed creatures who hunted close to the ground, which helped them see in shadowy places like under bushes. Since the Wakanreans are slightly taller than humans, I opted to give them round pupils.

What makes you laugh?

The unexpected, especially when it includes a dose of karma. I love seeing someone who deserves it get their comeuppance when they least expect it.

What makes you cry?

Pretty much anything at all sad. I don’t just cry reading sad books or watching sad movies. A commercial on TV can make me tear up.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I love to be amused. This is certainly reflected in my books to some extent, although they are not primarily humorous. But in terms of what I look for in a book, I want to be transported to a different time and place and I want to care what happens to the characters in the story.

Is there anything else you want to add about the story, series that has not already been mentioned?

Come visit Wakanreo!

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

Comment on my blog (http://carmenspage.blogspot.com/). Or if it’s a private question, my email is on the ‘About’ page on my blog.

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Carmen Webster Buxton author of Novels: The Sixth Discipline, No Safe Haven, Tribes, The Nostalgia Gambit, Shades of Empire, King of Trees, Saronna’s Gift, Turnabout, Alien Bonds and Novella: Where Magic Rules

Connect with Carmen via:

Interview with AR DeClerck

It is a pleasure to welcome author AR DeClerck to talk about the story Bound To You.

Welcome AR to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your story better!

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

Bound to You is the basic premise of the story, to be honest. The characters experience a bond that syncs them physically and psychically and makes it difficult to deny their attraction.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to? I have always adored SFR and I love reading it. I knew I wanted to write about characters who find love through adventure, and what better backdrop than space?

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others? This novel required some research into energy, wormholes, travel in space, giant bugs that look like crickets, and biochemical syncing of two bodies. It was loads of fun!

What makes you laugh?

Irony makes me laugh. When someone gets what’s coming to them, but doesn’t realize it til the end (good or bad) I chuckle a little. Animal videos, too, of course!

What makes you cry?

Those sappy sad declarations of love, especially at the moment when it seems all is lost and the person has to break down and say what they really feel before it’s too late. Those always get me.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I love Firefly, Sherlock, Killjoys and Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency. I think you’ll see a little of everything in my stories, especially the idea of those close connections to the people around you and how they shape your decisions and your life.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

Find me on facebook at www.facebook.com/authoramydeclerck and join me on Pinterest at www.pinterest.com/amydeclerck

Bound To You is on sale until 02/01/2018 at Amazon, iBooks, BN.com, Kobo, Indigo, Angus Robertson

AR DeClerck is a wife, mother, and writer who lives in the Upper Midwest with her family, two spoiled dogs and a wily cat. She spends her nights on the couch writing romances filled with adventure, sadness, joy and love. She’s always looking for the next great romance.

Find AR at www.ardeclerck.com
www.Twitter.com/@ARDeClerck
Join her newsletter http://amyreadsandwrites.blogspot.com/p/newsletter-sign-ups.html

And find updated links to all her books (available at all retailers) http://amyreadsandwrites.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html

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