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Reading Adventures: Lost in Translation, Part 3

Welcome to Part 3 of my Lost in Translation blog article series!!

I recently re-read the digital manga that was based on the Harlequin Romance novel, The Marine & The Princess by Cathie Linz. During my re-read, I found some interesting differences between the original version and the manga version, which inspired me to create another “Lost In Translation” article.

As usual, I will start this article with the basic format differences between the two versions of the story The Marine & The Princess:

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The original version is a paperback, first published in 2001 in North America, with 187 pages and contains words only.

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The manga version is a digital ebook, first published in 2009 in Japan, with 127 pages and contains words with illustrations.

The following interesting differences can be seen between these two versions:

Difference 1

The military rank of the Mark Wilder, the male lead of the story, is different between the two versions.

The original version his rank is given as:

    “Captain”

The manga version his jokingly gives his rank as “General” at first, but his actual rank is…

    “Lieutenant”

Difference 2

The manga version, as seen in the pic below, mentions or shows brand name U.S. based restaurants, but the original does not mention or describe a brand name. The original only mentions that the characters are going to or eating at “a fast-food restaurant”.

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Difference 3

The original version has a silver necklace with a slipper charm as a prominent symbol of the character’s romance within the story. However, the manga version does not include this symbol at all within the story.

These point out some interesting differences between these two versions. However, the differences seem to be more artistic, than translation based issues.

I hope you enjoyed this installment of my Lost In Translation series of posts and will post another article on this topic soon!

Reading Adventures: Lost in Translation, Part 3

Welcome to Part 3 of my Lost in Translation blog article series!!

I recently re-read a digital manga that was based on the Harlequin novel, The Wedding In White by Diana Palmer. During my re-read, I found a few differences between the original version and the manga version.

Below are the basic format differences of these differences between the two versions:

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The original version published in 2000 as a paperback in North America, exclusively for new members for eHarlequin.com, with 187 pages and contains words only.

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The manga version is a digital ebook, first published in 2008 in Japan, with 144 pages and contains words with illustrations.

There are a few differences between the two versions which I thought were a bit unusual and worth mentioning in more detail.

Difference 1

The story name of the town, the setting of the story, is different between the two versions.

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In the manga version, the name of the town is “Medisene Ridge” (see above), but in the original version, the name is “Medicine Ridge”.

This most likely happened because of how this name was first translated into Japanese and then translated back to English.

Difference 2

There is a plot element difference between the two versions:

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In the manga, a locket (see above) is given to the main female character by the family of the main male character of the story, but in the original version, there is no mention of a locket at any point of the story.

I have no idea why the manga version added this plot element. However, it would be interesting to find out if it was artistic license or if the original author was aware of this addition to the plot.

Difference 3

Two of the characters in the story have different names between the two versions:

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1). The girlfriend of the main male character is named “Clair” in the manga version (see above), but it is “Glenna” in the original version.

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2). The boyfriend of the main female character’s friend, Vivian, and sister to the main male character is named “Hewlett” in the manga version (see above), but it is “Whit” in the original version.

I have no idea why these character name differences occurred. This might also be another example of artistic license instead of differences between the translation and re-translation from the English, to Japanese and back to English.

I hope you enjoyed this latest installment of my “Lost In Translation” series. Please stay tuned for the next one, which will be posted in a few weeks.

Lost in Translation Cover Comparison: The Wedding in White

Topic: Lost in Translation Cover Comparison: The Wedding in White

Since I started my “Lost In Translation” series of blog posts, I thought it would be interesting to continue this companion piece started during the A to Z Blog Challenge. This post will focus on the different covers between the original novel version and the manga version of “The Wedding In White” by Diana Palmer.

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Manga Cover has the following characteristics:

*Setting is outdoors
*The couple is in the foreground with a fruit bearing tree just behind them
*The man is wearing a tuxedo in white
*The woman is wearing a white wedding gown with a huge bow on her arm
*The man is carrying the women with her arms around his head and not his neck
*The woman is holding an eye patch in her hand
*There is a ranch house is in the background

Observation: This version is trying to covey the characters and the wedding between them. It also hints to an important piece of the plot, which is represented by the positioning of the women’s arms and the eye patch in her hand.

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Novel Cover has the following characteristics:

*Setting is outdoors
*A bouquet of roses sits on the ground in the foreground
*The couple is standing in a dancing pose more in the background than the foreground
*The man is wearing a tuxedo in black
*The woman is wearing a white wedding gown without bows
*There is a ranch house near the background with trees and mountains in the distance

Observation: It is harder to understand what it is trying to covey with this version. There does not seem to be any hints of the plot except for the couple in wedding clothes and the location of the story.

My next Lost In Translation post will review and compare the original The Wedding in White novel and the manga version.

#AtoZChallenge Cover Comparison

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A-Z Blog Challenge Topic: Cover Comparison

Since I started my “Lost In Translation” series of blog posts, I thought it would be interesting to create a companion piece on the different covers created for each version.

A Wife In Time by Cathie Linz

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Manga Cover has the following characteristics:

*Setting is outdoors
*Flowers are everywhere
*Couple is arm and arm, but not embracing
*The man is wearing a suit jacket and tie
*The women is wearing an elegant gown
*Each of them are holding on to a necklace that she is wearing

Observation: This version is trying to covey the characters and highlight an important piece of the plot

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Novel Cover has the following characteristics:

*Setting is indoors
*Lightning can be seen through the window in the background
*The couple are shown in a heated embrace
*The man is wearing just a shirt and pair of pants
*The women is wearing just a slip like piece of clothing

Observation: This version is trying to covey the passionate nature of the couple’s relationship

Lost in Translation.

This blog article compliments my “Lost In Translation” series of blog articles that compares an original North American novel written in English with the manga version of the novel translated back to English. This blog article discusses some of the issues with translation from a different point of view than mine. Some very interesting information on the translation process and how it is not as easy as picking up a dictionary.

Zen Scribbles

No, I’m not talking about the movie; I just thought it was high time I talked about my field of expertise. What brought this up now? An excellent translation of a German novel that made me wonder whether I would’ve enjoyed the story as much if I’d read it in its main language, and a translation of a Swedish novel that is supposedly hilarious but has so far failed to make me crack a smile.

Back in university, the one thing professors often drilled into us was that translators are mirrors. A good translator would create a perfect reflection of the source text in a different language, while a bad translator might just as well be doodling all over the mirror with a black felt-tip pen. I may not have much experience under my belt, but I do recognize a bad mirror when I see one.

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Reading Adventures: Lost in Translation, Part 2

Welcome to Part 2 of my Lost in Translation blog article series!!
I recently re-read a digital manga that was based on the Harlequin novel, Wife In Time by Cathie Linz. During my re-read, I found a few differences between the original version and the manga version. Therefore, these differences warranted another Lost In Translation article.

I am going to use the following comparison to show the Basic format differences between the two versions of Wife in Time:

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The original version is a paperback, first published in 1985 in North America, with 187 pages and contains words only.

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The manga version is a digital ebook, first published in 2008 in Japan, with 125 pages and contains words with illustrations

There are a few differences between the two versions which I thought were a bit unusual and worth mentioning in more detail.

Difference 1

The story starts at a convention and each version has a different name for it. The difference is subtle, but it is interesting to see.

The original version names the convention as:

    American Publishing Convention

The manga version names the convention as:

    The All American Book Fair

I am unsure of why the difference, but it is an interesting translation difference.

Difference 2

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The manga page above shows that the main female character has a cellular phone and tries to use it, but the original version only mentions that cellular communications were in use, but does not say that either of the main characters were using one.

The addition of the main character using a cellular phone makes sense with the difference of publication date between the original version and the manga version. In 1985, cellular phones were not as commonplace in day-to-day life as it is in 2008.

Difference 3

Each version has a discussion about the status of Yellow Fever in the year 1885.

      The original version has a discussion on Yellow Fever in a hotel room and had some vague mention of it being found while they were building the Panama Canal. The discussion did not go into any specifics about who invented the cure for it.

The manga version has a discussion on Yellow Fever while the main characters are walking down on a street and didn’t make any mention of the Panama Canal. The discussion included mention of the Japanese Scientist who discovered the cure for it.

The mention of the Japanese scientist makes sense because the manga version was published in Japan.
The difference in location of the discussion is not so easily explained, but is interesting to note.

As you can see, the differences between the two versions of A Wife In Time are not the same as the differences I mentioned in Part 1 of my Lost In Translation series. Therefore, I will look forward to more of these adventures and if there are any more of these “lost in translation” situations.

Reading Adventures: Lost in Translation, Part 1

I had an interesting adventure today reading a digital manga version of a Harlequin Romance novel that I read sometime ago. This particular digital manga was based on the Harlequin novel, Heartbreaker by Diana Palmer.

Diana Palmer is one of my favorite novelist and I always look forward to reading all her novels no matter what format it is in. However, there was quite a difference between the original version and the manga version. Now, I understand that there will be a difference between these two formats because of the following basic differences between the formats including:

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The original version is a paperback with 192 pages and contains words only

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The manga version is a digital eBook with 65 pages and contains words with illustrations

What I found interesting was the difference between the translation of the main female character’s first name. In the original, her name is Tellie, while the manga version her name is Terry.

Now in order to understand part of the reason why there is a difference in the main character’s first name is how Japanese language treats the letter “L” during the translation process. There is no letter “L” in the Japanese language and when that letter is translated from English to Japanese the letter “R” is used instead of the letter “L”. Therefore, the name Tellie changes into Terrie. However, that name is then translated to Terry when translated back to English from the Japanese. This makes sense as a one to one translation from Japanese to English without the original material. So here are my questions regarding this name difference:

Why did the editor and/or translator not verify the spelling of the main character’s first name with the original material during the whole process?

Was it lack of access to the original material?

Was it lack of money?

Was it timing?

Was it a lack of understanding of the original material?

I doubt if I will ever get answers to these questions, but I just wanted to express how this puzzled me when I read this digital manga version.

I wonder if I will find any other interesting differences as I purchase more manga versions of some of my favorite romance novels that are available through the Nook Book store of Barnes & Noble.

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I will look forward to more of these adventures and if there are any more of these “lost in translation” situations.

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