Tag Archive | Fangirls

Hansi Oppenheimer Talks About SqueeCon

It is a great pleasure to welcome back Hansi Oppenheimer to talk about her latest project, SqueeCon.

Hansi welcome back to EverydayFangirl.com and thanks so much for taking the time to stop by and discuss SqueeCon with us!

When and where is this event?

The event will be held on Saturday, December 1, 2018, at the Lyric Hall, 827 Whalley Avenue New Haven, CT, between 1-9pm. Tickets are just $15 online use code HH2018 https://filmfreeway.com/SqueeCon/tickets
They will be $20 at the door and $10 after 6pm for those who just want to briefly check out the con and participate in Nerd Karaoke. Kids under 12 are free.
Getting to the Event:

By Driving-There is free parking in the park across the street from the venue.

By Train-It is 3 miles from the Metro North New Haven Union Station stop. There is an abundance of Lyft locally since it’s a University town.

What first prompted you to create SqueeCon?

My niece is the one who found the venue and pitched a Squee! screening which the venue loved. I figured that if I had access to this big beautiful venue I should share the opportunity with the community so it became SqueeCon.
I’m hoping to make this an ongoing venture and take the Con around the country to small venues in other communities and bring Fangirls together to create a huge supportive network. Wouldn’t that be a wonderful thing?

How will this con be different from other cons?

The inaugural edition of SqueeCon is a celebration of films, art, music, cosplay and more by women and female identifying individuals. SqueeCon is the first ever one-day event celebrating the arts by a collective of Fangirls creators and will cover the entire gamut of fandom experience. It is a fan con so no big celebrities, just a fun con where you can go and talk with the creators and guests in a very intimate, casual setting. A perfect place to network, so bring your cards!

What guests are expected to attend?

SqueeCon is pleased to welcome film-makers, nerds, geeks, writers, Fangirls, cosplayers, vendors and more to join hands in support of the community. Several eminent cosplay guests have accepted the invitation to be there, including Christine Evans, Cate Broomhead, Rowena Cosplays, Ayla Ocasio, Jacob Daniel Womack, Jenn Wotchertonks. performers Tea Time For Mad Girls, and Cat Smith. Vendors include writer L. E. Hellman, baker Melissa Robles, artist Jimmy Gatti, and Carol Ann Swan.

What activities and events will be available for attendees?

There will be screenings of Alana King’s Wayward: The Documentary, a teaser of the docu-series about women Star Wars fans, Looking for Leia and a block of short films performances, panels, there’s a bar with beer, wine, cider and soft drinks and we’re having a mixer/meetup with Nerd Karaoke from 7-9 pm. I’m still working on finding a food truck but there is a restaurant across the street.

How do you decide what programming is available?

SqueeCon’s mission is to support and promote the creative and fandom works of women and LGBTQA individuals so I reached out to friends who perform, make films and I have a page on FilmFreeway for people to submit short films for consideration. We’ve got some great films from all over the world!

How has social media helped or hindered you in this effort?

Everyone has been very supportive promoting the event. We’ve gotten shout outs on podcasts and twitter. I’ve used social media to create an audience for Squee! And this is just an extension of the project, a big one but basically the same message: I love Fangirls and want to give them the opportunity to network, broaden their audiences and party! If you know me, you know I’m usually at the bar at cons between panels having fascinating conversations with other fans, so this is just my bringing the con to the bar!

What have you learned from your fan community to help you with planning for the event?

That fangirls are the best! I’ve got a great enthusiastic team of volunteers. My attendees have been wonderful, offering to help in whatever way they could. You know, when fangrrls get together -we can do anything!

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane while creating this event?

One day at a time. I just deal with what I need to get done and try not to get ahead of myself. There’s enough small practical details to keep me busy every day. I’ve been working in Events (Box Office or Film Festivals) since 2009 and attend a lot of cons, so I have a pretty good handle on what we need to do. The contracts and venue rental aspect is new but I was lucky to find such a fabulous venue with a very fandom supportive owner (she’s a Whovian!)

What kind of research did you have to do before you created this event?

I’ve had to go through dozens of film submission and figure out a screening block that makes sense. I’m still working on scheduling. I had to look for someone to handle Nerd Karaoke, but again I got lucky with my friend James Hinsey who offered to bring the gear and manage the tech aspects. I had to check the venue for a/v specs and figure out how to set up panels, screenings and performances as smoothly as possible. I’m lucky to have a niece with years of experience as a Stage Manager who walked me through the venue.

Is there anything else you would like to share about SqueeCon not already mentioned?

Please come and bring your friends! It’s going to be a blast.

How can readers of EverydayFangirl.com find out more about the event?

For more information, please visit: https://filmfreeway.com/SqueeCon or one of the following links:

SqueeCon on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/troubledgirlfilms
SqueeCon Event page https://www.facebook.com/events/2173533299602123
SqueeCon Twitter https://twitter.com/SqueeCon

Submit films https://filmfreeway.com/SqueeCon

Buy Tickets https://filmfreeway.com/SqueeCon/tickets

For vendors SqueeCon offers a great opportunity to deliver their content to their core audience. Applications are welcome for small tables ($25) and large tables ($50). Write to: squeefilm@gmail.com before November 25.

Advertisers can book space in the program themed around Riot Grrl fanzines of the 90s in the following sizes and price levels: Full page ($40) for 8.5 X 11, Half page ($20) for 5.5 x 8.5, and Quarter page ($15) for 5.5 x 4.25, in Color or B&W and PDF format.

For ads and more information, please email: squeefilm@gmail.com

Media Contact: Hansi Oppenheimer

Company Name: Troubled Girl Productions

Interview with a Fangirl: Indrani

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is my pleasure to interview Indrani, @Indranee, who is a Writer/Editor and of course a Fangirl!

I became aware of Indrani through the Twitter Star Wars Fangirl Community!

Welcome Indrani to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl and thank you for taking the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

When I was in my early teens for Star Trek and just last year when I watched The Last Jedi, for Star Wars, even though I’d been a casual fan of the franchise since A New Hope was first released when I was young.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

It helped me connect with other fans, and discuss topics and also meet some like-minded folk and even get into groups to go to conventions with. This primarily happened with Trek, but also Star Wars. However, I’ve also had some bad experiences with fans who are overbearing and plain nasty and want to hammer home their ideas at the expense of anyone elses. I also don’t like Stans in general (even though I’m a ‘shipper of all sorts of stuff LOL), and I think there is a particular contingent of Stans or ‘shippers who get very unpleasant on social media.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings,Harry Potter, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I first watched Star Trek (OST) when I was very young, in grade school, and then the movies, then TNG, then DS9, VOY, ENT, etc. I fell in love right away but there was a guy in my high school who was a HUGE Trekkie upon whom I was nursing a fair-sized crush, and I suspect that might have helped things along a bit! LOL. Lately, I’ve become very impressed with ST: Discovery and have acually paid to watch it.

I first watched Star Wars when A New Hope was released and watched the rest of the OT, but didn’t become a fangirl even though I liked the movies. The PT didn’t help much although I didn’t dislike it. I just wasn’t drawn to it. Perhaps I felt like I would betray Trek if I loved SW too much, but this wasn’t a conscious thought. I didn’t read any SW/EU novels (I’ve obsessed over Trek novels over the years), and didn’t watch Clone Wars, etc, either. I became a SW fangirl after I watched TLJ. It completely changed my mind about the SW OT/PT/ST ribboned connection, and I’m now a heavily invested fan of 9-film Skywalker-Solo drama LOL.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

The Trek community has been close to my heart for a long time and I have a lot of friends with whom I’m close whom I met online and via SM and discussion boards. Some of these friends became my real life friends and I admire and love and value them. I’ve written fanfic with them and also written non-Trek work with them. Trek is an intimate and ongoing part of my life and its values.

I’m just now beginning to make some friends in the SW community, but it’s not at the same level yet. I’m taking things slow… I’ve met some interesting people through the Reylo community and have discovered some great fanfic writers.

What else do you Fangirl about?

I love The Americans, Timeless, Sherlock (love SherLolly!), and a lot of Netflix original dramas.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

I think I’ve realized that it’s actually harder to be a Star Wars fangirl than to be a Trek fangirl!

I never thought that I would feel this way when I first became interested in the Sequel Trilogy, but the nastiness toward it from the original fanboys is certainly astounded, to say the least. I’m also discovering that women who like Star Wars seem have a more difficult road to travel in terms of the attitude of the rest of the fandom. I’ve noticed strains of belittling and condescension toward the SW female fans from some contingents of male SW fans that I never encountered in the Trek community. These negative reactions are strewn all over Youtube vids, Tumblr, Facebook and Twitter

Throughout my life as a female Trekkie, I’d always felt as if I was part of a special, treasured group… sure, there were a few patronizing groups here and there, but Trek fandom is so varied and also Trek series and movies are so used to being reinvented that there’s a tendency for the larger fandom to be much more accepting of variety. Add to this the fact that Trek has always had women “on top”, meaning within TPTB. D.C. Fontana, Majel Barrett Roddenberry, Nichelle Nichols, Nana Visitor, Kate Mulgrew, Jeri Taylor (who was a primary writer/producer on Voyager, etc… and many novelists and scriptwriters/producers form parts of the hefty backbone of Trek-lit and screenworks.

Compared to this, I feel SW has been traditionally more male-centric, and brilliant actors and writers like Carrie Fisher have correctly avowed that this needs to change. Thankfully, I see this change happening recently, and I believe Twitter and Tumblr are in fact part and parcel of this change, because SW writers, including Storygroup writers as well as novelists seem to routinely interact with fangirls within the community, leading to a healthy amount of discussions and give and take of info and opinions. Despite the ever-present “nastiness” that’s always lurking within, I think Social Media, especially Twitter has been a breakthrough platform for this communal exchange. So, in many ways, SM is a double-edged sword.

Where can others interact with you?

They can Tweet or DM me @indranee

Interview with a Fangirl: Shay

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is my pleasure to interview Blogger, Podcaster and Fangirl Shay!

I became aware of Shay through the Twitter Star Wars Fangirl Community!

Welcome Shay to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl and thank you for taking the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When did you realize you were a Fangirl?

I actually didn’t realize I was a “fangirl” until fairly recently. I’ve always been really into sci-fi, fantasy, and the like, and I have that kind of personality where, if I set my mind to something, I pretty much never let it go. I’ve been crazy about Star Wars on and off for years, but only a few years ago did I actually really begin to be more open about it, discovering podcasts, fan sites, cosplay, and all the other awesome aspects of it.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

Shay with Sisters and Friend

For me, social media has been very helpful, though I’ve only had limited exposure to it. I just began with Twitter a few months ago, and it’s been a big help in keeping up-to-date on all the news, theories, and getting connected with all the other amazing fans out there.

One of the biggest things that got me back into Star Wars, and caused me to be as active in it as I am now, was getting to know several other major Star Wars fans about my age though a chat-board. All of us started talking about it together, and it was actually through people on there that I was first exposed to terms such as “fangirl”, “shipping”, and “feels”.

We all help each other grow in our love for the series, talking through all our theories, and sharing our knowledge with others who are new to it all. It was amazing. In fact, those guys are the biggest reason why The Elven Padawan even exists today; had it not been for their enthusiasm and overwhelming support when I first mentioned the idea of starting my own podcast, I probably never would have started that endeavor. Because of each other, we’ve all gotten way more involved in this stuff than we ever intended to be, and it’s been a fantastic ride all the way.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I first saw Star Wars when I was very young, probably around the age of three. I still remember walking into our media room and finding my dad watching The Phantom Menace. I was immediately drawn in by the odd green guys with funny hats and no noses, and the girl with the enormous red dress who looked like she was wearing an upside-down chandelier on her head. I watched the prequels a lot over the next several years, and absolutely loved them, even though I didn’t totally understand all the details of the story.

For some reason, my love for the movies died away, and I went through a lapse where I could care less about Star Wars. I basically avoided it as much as possible. Then all of a sudden, several years ago, my dad bought and began watching through the entire saga with my sisters, and I found myself right in the middle of it again. Then came the announcement of work beginning on another movie, and by the time The Force Awakens released, I had become a big fan of the animated branch of the story though Star Wars Rebels.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

You can always find something to talk to people about. There’s no excuse to not be friendly to people just because you’re completely different. To quote an old Jedi proverb we first heard from Bail Organa, “The smallest gesture of kindness can fill a galaxy with hope.” One of the greatest kindness I can show, or that you can show me, is taking the time to talk to me and listen to what I have to say. I’ve made very good friends with people I know only through internet correspondence, and had great conversations with people, all starting with each of us finding out that the other liked the same story. That’s amazing to me, how a teenaged girl can just walk into a random comic book store a state away from where she lives, and strike up an in-depth conversation with a middle-aged man who works there about Grey Jedi, whether Luke actually has to be the only Force-user in the Rebellion, and if Kanan Jarrus is technically a Jedi Knight (and yes, this actually happened to me this summer!).

What else do you Fangirl about?

I was introduced to The Lord of the Rings series a couple years ago, and immediately picked up with that franchise. It reminded me a lot of Star Wars in many ways, and I loved how deep and involved it was, with all the different locations, time periods, races, and cultures of Middle-Earth. Since I saw the movies first, they always hold a special place in my heart, but nothing compares to Tolkien’s original books. And yes, that includes The Silmarillion, Beren and Luthien, The Children of Hurin, not just LOTR and The Hobbit.

I’m also a huge reader, so if I’m not talking the ears off someone about something that’ll have an 80% chance of turning fandom or philosophy related, planning another cosplay, or trying to figure out lightsaber moves in the driveway with a bamboo pole, I’ve probably got my nose stuck in a book somewhere.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

Don’t be afraid to get your voice out there because you don’t have the same opinions and thoughts as everyone else in the fandom! A lot of my own theories and the things I believe are totally different than the ones currently trending with a lot of the loudest voices in the fandom, but that’s OK. You’ll find that if you get your voice out there, there are a lot of people who think like you who will come out, too. I never thought I’d find other kids my age who were as involved in the deep aspects of the mythology of Star Wars as I am, and who draw the same connections to real-life things like history and theology, but I started talking and putting myself out there, and I’ve connected with some great people. And you’re going find a lot of people who might not agree with you all the time, but are still supportive and awesome and try to help you out anyway. There are still those out there that like to look down on you because you love a certain trilogy, or like Tauriel even though she wasn’t in the book, or just for being a fangirl in general, but don’t let that change who you are.

Where can others interact with you?

Interact with me via…
The Elven Padawan podcast and site or on Twitter: Elven Padawan (@ElvenPadawan

Interview with a Fangirl: Mel

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is my pleasure to interview Fangirl, Podcaster and Blogger Mel Perez, @jane_anon.

I became aware of Mel through the Black Girl Nerds blog and the Twitter Star Wars and Doctor Who Fan Communities.

Welcome Mel to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl and thank you for taking the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

I don’t have a specific moment that I can look to and say that’s when I realized it. I grew up loving 80s fantasy, science fiction and anime. Until maybe high school, I thought this was completely normal. It’s only later that I discovered that everyone wasn’t always watching Conan, Star Wars or some anime dubbed in Spanish in their free time. If I had to pick a time, I would probably say high school. That’s when I become involved in message boards, chat rooms and websites for the shows I loved. Shout out to AOL Chat. I guess that’s when my fangirling leveled up.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

For the most part, social media has helped me. It got me involved with Black Girl Nerds. It helped me find a group to start a podcast with. It’s how I find people who are interested in the same things as me. It’s not all positive though. There’s something about being a woman and especially a woman of color on social media that almost invites trolls. It paints a target on your back saying please question everything I say, assume I don’t know anything and basically treat me like an idiot. I’m not the best at dealing with them. It does make me want to leave sometimes. I’ve had periods when I had to lock my account just to avoid all of the people attacking me.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I was really young when I first saw Star Wars so I can’t say exactly when. I think my first clearest memory of seeing it was when I was 10. I was riveted to the screen. I remember my cousins trying to get my attention to go play outside but they would have had to drag me to get me away from that movie. The moment I saw Luke watch the twin suns setting on Tatooine with the John Williams score swelling in the background, I knew I was in love.

Star Trek, on the other hand, is a more interesting story. My mother and my grandmother loved the original show. I didn’t. It took me until after college to start watching Star Trek: The Next Generation. It took some time but I did fall in love with it and Deep Space Nine which took me even longer to watch. I still haven’t seen the original series though I did take my mother and grandmother to see the first reboot for Mother’s Day.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

I’m not as involved in the Star Wars fan community as I would like. The fan communities I think of fondly are Harry Potter, Supernatural, Doctor Who, the Marvel Cinematic Universe, even Teen Wolf. I think fondly of these communities made up of mostly women who loved to talk about the works, write about them, vid them, etc. Being involved in these communities helped me come out of my shell. It pushed me to start writing. These communities emphasized that my opinion mattered and that it was okay emotionally invested in these properties. I’ve met so many amazing fangirls who have become true friends. Fangirls have brought so much joy into my life.

What else do you Fangirl about?

I named a few of them in the last answer. I’ve spent the past year fangirling about Yuri on Ice. It rekindled my love of figure skating which I am also now fangirling about. I’m still an MCU fangirl though I may get superhero fatigue now and then. Also comic books, marine animals, 80s fantasy movies forever, Game of Thrones, Orphan Black, Bob’s Burgers and mid to late 90s/early 2000s anime. After Star Wars, Doctor Who is probably my biggest fandom.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

It’s awesome. It’s empowering. It’s fun. It’s fulfilling.

Where can others interact with you?

I can be found tweeting about comics, Yuri on Ice, Doctor Who or Star Wars at @jane_anon.

Interview with a Fangirl – Connie

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is my pleasure to interview Fangirl Connie Shih!

I became aware of Connie through the Twitter Star Wars Fangirl Community.

Welcome Connie to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl and thank you for taking the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

I became enamored with The Muppet Show on TV when I was five-years-old. A talking frog, pig, and bear? Colorful creatures of all shapes and sizes? Instant Muppet fangirl!

How has social media helped or hindered you?

At the moment, social media (primarily Twitter) has helped me connect with Star Wars fans, podcasts, and fan sites from all over the world. Overall, it’s been wonderful to interact with fellow fans and become a member of Star Wars Twitter fan community. However, there is also an unfortunate downside with trolls and toxicity. In those instances, when it’s become overwhelming, I’ve found it’s perfectly fine to take a break from social media. I’ve also discovered that Twitter (with its character limit) often hinders in depth discussions, so it’s better to engage in those discussions elsewhere where there is more space for elaboration. Prior to the Star Wars Twitter fan community, I used Tumblr for several years to connect with fellow fans in the Glee fan community.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I first saw Return of the Jedi in 1983 on the big screen when I was eight-years-old, and instantly fell in love with Princess Leia, Luke Skywalker, and Ewoks. Return of the Jedi was my gateway to Star Wars and later paved the way for my love of Star Trek and Lord of the Rings.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

I’ve been mostly involved with the Glee fan community and Star Wars fan community in recent years and both have been welcoming and felt like family.

In the Glee fan community, I’ve met fellow fans in person, attended concerts and book signings with them, and become lifelong friends with many of them. I’ve also collaborated professionally with fellow Glee fans in academia. Overall, it’s been incredibly positive and satisfying.

In the Star Wars fan community, it’s been fantastic to connect with so many on a daily basis on Twitter. I hope to meet fellow fans in person one day and attend meetup or a Star Wars Celebration.

What else do you Fangirl about?

I love musicals (both Broadway and movie), am a proud Gleek (fan of the Fox TV musical dramedy, Glee). Trekkie (Star Trek fan), and a Lord of the Rings fan.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

Don’t be afraid to embrace what you love! There are so many ways and places for fangirls to celebrate their fandom and support each other. Reach out and connect with others and don’t let the trolls get under your skin. We have your back!

Where can others interact with you?

You can find me on Twitter @connieshih. I’m also working on launching a new personal blog called Connie’s Corner (https://ckshih.wordpress.com) in 2018 where you’ll find my thoughts on a variety of topics of interest including Star Wars and pop culture.

Interview with a Fangirl: Christina G

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is my pleasure to interview Fangirl Christina G, a Disney Store Cast Member who loves everything about Disney, especially Star Wars!

I became aware of Christina through the Twitter Star Wars Fangirl Community.

Welcome Christina to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl and thank you for taking the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

Probably when I would have the urge to wear an item of clothing featuring something I was a fan of…haha.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

Social media has helped me in so many ways. The most important one is that I’ve gained many wonderful friends because we share the love for a fandom. I’ve gained one of my best friends because of us sharing our love for the same fandom. Social media has been a blessing to me & I hope that never changes.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I actually was WAY late to the Star Wars fandom. I entered the fandom in late December of 2015 (after The Force Awakens came out). People were so pumped for this franchise, I wanted to see what it was about. I watched A New Hope, which is my favorite SW film, & I loved it. Ended up watching ESB right afterwards. Took me 3 days to watch the 6 movies. I guess you can say I loved it right away. I then watched TFA, Rogue One & even watched Star Wars Rebels. I continue to love love LOVE it.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

I have learned that the Star Wars community is a family. Everyone is a part of this amazing community. We may have our different theories and favorite characters but in the end, we all stand by together to support this franchise that we have come to know and love. I was welcomed with open arms into this community & I am very happy to share my love for this franchise with others who love it as much as I do.

What else do you Fangirl about?

Disney has always been my first fandom. Grew up into Disney & I even work for them. I also fangirl about Supernatural & Marvel, mainly with Guardians of the Galaxy. But I am growing more into the Marvel Universe.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

Don’t be afraid to let your fangirl flag fly. Represent your fandom and show it off. You never know who else is a Star Wars, Marvel, Disney, etc. fan just like you.

Where can others interact with you?

You can connect with me via Twitter: @ganocj

Interview with a Fangirl: Erica L

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is my pleasure to interview Erica L, an artist with a passion for Star Wars.

I became aware of Erica through the Twitter Star Wars Community.

Welcome Erica to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl and thank you for taking the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When did you realize you were a Fangirl?

I’ve always been really “into” things – like films, books, and music, but only realized there was an actual word for it a few years ago – probably around 2011 or 2012. My first big fandom was (and still is) Star Wars.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

Social media has helped me when it comes to fangirling. Through websites like Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr, I’ve been able to connect with people who enjoy these movies as much as I do. It’s always fun to pass theories back and forth or come up with new stories for some of our favorite characters. Being an artist, it’s also fun for me to post my work online for other fans to see.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

My uncle first showed me Star Wars: A New Hope back when I was three or so and I’ve been a fan ever since. I can’t imagine a time where Star Wars wasn’t a big part of my life. Growing up, I remember Leia was my favorite character to pretend to be. She was (and still is) definitely a big role model for me. I really can’t put into words how much I love Star Wars and how much of an impact it’s had on me.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

Like I said before, it’s wonderful being able to communicate with other fans. Fan communities are a place to talk about our favorite fandoms and connect over our mutual love for it. I’ve definitely been able to “meet” several people online – many of whom I could possibly never have the chance of getting to “know” if it weren’t for the Internet.

What else do you Fangirl about?

I’ve also been a fan of Marvel for about three or four years now, and I just got into the Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter films this year. It didn’t take long before I realized they were going to be a big deal to me.

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

Embrace your inner fangirl! Don’t feel like you need to hide who you really are. If you’re a fangirl of movies, books, music etc. enjoy it!

Where can others interact with you?

Connect with me on Twitter and Instagram: @e_brienne. You can also find me on my personal blog at: ebrienne.tumblr.com.

Interview with a Fangirl: Kelly from Team Ahsoka

I am continuing with my series of interviews with Fangirls that I have met through social media!

Today, it is my pleasure to interview Fangirl Kelly McGuire, who is freelance translator by day and a hopeless nerd by night. Hailing from the tiny nation of Gibraltar, she now lives in the Netherlands and spends nearly every waking moment thinking about, tweeting about, or blogging about that galaxy far, far away. Or serving her feline overlords.


I became aware of Kelly through her Team Ahsoka Blog and of course her very active Twitter account, TeamAhsoka!

Welcome Kelly to The Adventures of The Everyday Fangirl and thank you for taking the time to answer these questions about being a Fangirl.

When do you realize you were a Fangirl?

I guess I’ve always been a fangirl at heart but it wasn’t until my late teens – when the Internet really took off – that I started following fandom news closely and started visiting websites and message boards to see what other fans had to say.

How has social media helped or hindered you?

Trolls and all-too-frequent fandom dramas aside, I’m extremely grateful for social media. I’ve met a lot of enthusiastic, kind, creative, and talented people from all around the world and have spent countless hours discussing the finer points of Force lore, promoting my Team Ahsoka articles, sharing fan art, chuckling at memes, admiring cosplayers’ handiwork, and conveying my thoughts through well-chosen GIFs.

Social media may not do much for my overall productivity but the people I’ve met through Twitter more than make up for it.

When did you first see Star Wars or other favorite fandom, such as Star Trek, Lord of The Rings, etc. and did you love it right away or did this grow on you over time?

I can’t really pinpoint when I was first introduced to Star Wars. It must have been sometime in the 1980s, when the Original Trilogy was out on VHS. Admittedly, I don’t remember much about my first viewing of A New Hope, but I do remember being very taken by Darth Vader. I was hooked from the moment he walked onto the Tantive IV and while most female fans my age were drawn to Princess Leia or Han Solo, I was smitten with the Dark Lord of the Sith. I was an odd kid.

Since I never delved into the Expanded Universe (or Legends as it’s called today), my love for Star Wars didn’t really blossom until the release of the prequels. I’ll admit I wasn’t particularly impressed with The Phantom Menace when it first came out (I’ve changed my mind about it since then) but I was back on board the Star Wars hype train in time for Attack of the Clones… and have been a pretty devoted fan ever since.

What have you learned from the Star Wars fan community or other fan communities that has had a positive impact on your life?

One of the key things I’ve learnt – and one I wish I could tell my younger self about – is that there’s a community of like-minded fans out there who will support you and geek out with you when you’re feeling down. I’ve seen how people are always willing to lend a helping hand, whether it’s offering cosplay advice, helping them secure tickets for conventions, or simply supporting them through life’s ups and downs. And, thanks to the Internet, this community is even closer than you think.

As a female Star Wars fan from a tiny nation of only 30,000 people, there were times when I felt quite lonely, especially as a teenager at an all-female school. My peers were more interested in discussing boy bands than Max Rebo bands and very few of them played video games, so I didn’t really have anyone I could geek out with.

Nowadays, not a day goes by when I don’t chat with a friend I’ve met through social media and I often think back to that amazing weekend I had at Star Wars Celebration 2016 in London, where I was finally amongst “my people”.

What else do you Fangirl about?

Anyone who knows me well will know I’m somewhat obsessed with the Tomb Raider video game series (and its spin-off media), South Park, and Star Trek, particularly Deep Space Nine, Voyager, and the criminally underappreciated Enterprise.

I’m also a bit of an anime nerd and am always on the lookout for new series to watch. I used to watch series like Naruto and Bleach religiously a few years ago but I tend to favour the so-called “slice of life” series, such as Genshiken, Azumanga Daioh, and Himouto! Umaru-chan (its protagonist is my kindred spirit).

Anything else you want to say to others about being a Fangirl?

Never let anyone dictate what you’re allowed to enjoy. Beware the fandom gate-keepers and those who try to gauge if you’re a “true fan” (a term that really should be dumped in the nearest trash compactor).

And if you ever feel like you’re alone and don’t know anyone nearby who shares your hobbies and interests, jump onto Twitter. You’ll find plenty of other fangirls there who will happily nerd out with you. 😊

How can readers find and interact with you?

You can find me on Twitter (@TeamAhsoka), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/TeamAhsoka), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/teamahsoka/), or over on my blog Team Ahsoka.

Reflections on Year of The Fangirl

Topic: Reflections on Year of The Fangirl

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It has been over a year, since Ashley Eckstein, from Her Universe, declared 2013 the Year of The Fangirl and for me personally, it has been a great year and a continues to be a great initiative.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Ashley a few questions about the Year of The Fangirl and what she has seen over the past year:

Patty: What have you seen over the past year that encourages you to continue The Year of The Fangirl initiative?

Ashley: We were encouraged to continue with the Year of the Fangirl initiative because we have over 700 girls nominated to be a Fangirl of the Day and the submissions are still pouring in! Each and every fangirl deserves to be highlighted and we will keep going as long as we have Fangirls to showcase!

Patty: How diverse is the group of Fangirls that have been highlighted for The Fangirl of The Day?

Ashley: We’ve featured Fangirl babies to women who have been Fangirls for over 30 years! We’ve received nominations for girls of all ages, races and interests. Everyone’s stories are so inspiring to me!

You are not the only one who is inspired, Ashley!

Because this initiative exists, I was able to connect, on a daily basis, thanks to Facebook and Twitter with many inspiring Fangirls! In addition, this blog exists because these Fangirls and their stories inspire and encourage me to continue.

I knew I was not the only fangirl that has been inspired, over the past year, by this initiative. Therefore, I asked fellow Fangirl of The Day and co-host of Fangirls Going Rogue, Teresa Delgado, about what she thought the Year of the Fangirl did for female fans.

2013 was an amazing year for fangirls and Her Universe’s Year of the Fangirl was a great way fangirls to find other fangirls that share their fandom passions. I have seen lots more female fans speak up and be proud of who they are. This has inspired me to do the same and to reach for some of my goals in fandom. The support from other fans out there has increased as well and I have seen that no matter what gender fandom has become a more accepting place. While fandom still has a long way to go there seems to be more respect in the community. I think 2013 did a lot of good things for fandom but I think that what Year of The Fangirl did was give girls a voice.

Finally, I am honored to be named Fangirl of The Day and will continue to update this blog to inspire and encourage other Fangirls as well!

Thanks to both Ashley & Teresa for helping to contribute to this article!

You can also contribute by submitted a comment on how The Year of The Fangirl Initiative has inspired you!

#AtoZBlogChallenge: Fangirls Going Rogue

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#AtoZBlogChallenge Topic: Fangirls Going Rogue

Over the past year, the Her Universe Year of the Fangirl initiative has influenced many Fangirls around the world to connect with other Fangirls. I have been privileged to have spent time on Twitter talking to many different Fangirls about Star Wars, Doctor Who and many other fan related topics. I am so glad that the Year of The Fangirl gave me the opportunity to ‘meet’ and interact with other Fangirls just like me.

Two of the Fangirls that I have connected with because of this initiative are Tricia Barr and Teresa Delgado.

Tricia Barr, @fangirlcantina, Year of the Fangirl contributor, co-host of Fangirls Going Rogue podcast, a contributor to the Star Wars section of Suvudu.com, author of several Star Wars Insider magazine articles, the creator and writer of the novel, WYNDE and manages the popular fangirl related blog, fangirlblog.com.

Teresa Delgado, @icecoldpenguin, host of several Star Wars podcasts, including Fangirls Going Rogue podcast , contributor to Star Wars Report and currently manages two blogs, Fangirl Next Door and Quack In Over Disney.

These two Fangirls are both influential members of the Fangirl community and if it was not for The Year of The Fangirl initiative, I may never have met and interacted with either them. Therefore, I want to thank both Tricia and Teresa for taking the time to co-host a monthly Star Wars Fangirl podcast, called Fangirls Going Rogue, which can be found on the ShotGlass Digital Network. I also want to thank them for interacting with this Fangirl as well! I am proud to know both of you and look forward to the next monthly installment of Fangirls Going Rogue!

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