Tag Archive | Author Interview

Interview with an Author: Libby Doyle

It is a great pleasure to welcome Libby Doyle author of the The Passion Season: Book I of the Covalent Series.

Welcome Libby to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know more about you and your stories better!

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

“Passion” is part of the title of Book I of the Covalent Series for the reason you might expect. My two main characters—Zan and Barakiel—fall into a sizzling hot passion for each other that goes beyond the merely physical. The consequences of their love—and its beauty—is central to all the books in the series.

Barakiel is a superhuman warrior from another dimension. The leaders of his homeworld have outlawed serious relationships with humans so his passion for Zan is complicated, to say the least. It’s lucky she can handle pretty much anything that’s thrown at her.

“Season” also has an important meaning in the book, specifically, the change of seasons in the Earthly Realm. At every solstice and equinox, the Earth’s orbit stretches the fabric of existence to open rifts between the dimensions. Barakiel’s evil father, Lucifer, sends his minions through these rifts to attack his son. As you can imagine, if Lucifer were to discover that Barakiel is in love, it could get a bit dangerous for his girlfriend.

I’ve also published The Pain Season and The Vengeance Season, Books II and III of the Covalent Series. As for the meaning of pain and vengeance in these titles, I’ll leave it to your imagination!

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

This is such a great question for me! Almost everyone is familiar with the name Lucifer, the angel that defied God and was expelled from heaven. Barakiel is a lesser-known angel name, one of seven archangels and the leader of the Guardian Angels. In my book, however, Barakiel and Lucifer are not angels. They are Covalent, ancient beings who hold the cosmos in Balance. When human society was primitive, the Covalent often visited the Earthly Realm. They were the source of a lot of human mythology – not only angels but avatars, the djinn, the gods of the Greeks, a whole array.

Lucifer inspired all those human tales about Satan. He rebelled against the Covalent leadership and was driven out of Covalent City, but not completely defeated. He fled with his loyal dark warriors and regrouped. By the time the story begins, he’s become the powerful Lord of Destruction and the two sides are locked in a grim war.

As for Zan. Her name is short for Alexandra. I used it because I think it sounds cool.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I spent my formative years devouring all the fantasy and science fiction I could find. I started with A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle and moved onto J.R.R. Tolkien, Ursula K. Le Guin, Roger Zelazny and Frank Herbert (the Dune books), to name a few. I guess all those stories had to ferment in my brain for thirty years until The Covalent Series poured out.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

Beats me. I don’t think I am sane. A person has to be a little nuts to do so much work for so little money. I get frustrated that I can’t quit my day job. Ha Ha! I can dream.

What kind of research did you have to do for the series?

Physics! One of my main characters is Pellus, a friend and mentor to Barakiel, my male hero. Pellus is a being known as a Covalent traveler adept, born with the ability to perceive the molecular composition of things at the quantum level. Travelers study for a long time until they can move through the cosmos using interdimensional rifts. When they achieve mastery, they become adepts, the highest rank of traveler.

Adepts are BADASS. They can manipulate and alter the bonds that give structure to all things. Pellus can shift light to hide things. He can form impenetrable barriers out of thin air and burn or freeze his adversaries. He can travel through space in the blink of an eye. I read a book about physics so I could describe how Pellus sees the world.

What makes you laugh?

My husband. I make him laugh, too, the secret to our happy marriage.

What makes you cry?

Whenever an animal dies in a story. I simply cannot take it.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I’m a big fan of Joss Whedon of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel fame. He inspired me with this quote, one of my favorites: “Make it dark, make it grim, make it tough, but then, for the love of God, tell a joke.”

Words to live by! I took his advice. A lot the dialogue in my books is rich in humor.

Is there anything else you want to add about the Covalent Series that has not already been mentioned?

My heroine, Zan O’Gara, is a tough, battled-tested FBI agent. She does not submit and she does not need to be rescued. She is not claimed or owned and she will not be mistreated. Not anymore.

In addition, these books aren’t really light reads. Sure, they have lots of humor, but they go dark at times and the plots are complex. If you like total immersion in a world, I think you’ll like them.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

Through my website! You can contact me directly through my website’s “contact” page, as well as find all my social media links (Amazon Author Page, BookBub, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or Goodreads) and my mailing list sign up.

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The Passion Season: Book I of the Covalent Series by Libby Doyle

A superhuman warrior from another dimension. An FBI agent with a troubled past. A love that will burn through the cosmos.

When Special Agent Zan O’Gara investigates a ritual murder, she meets the only man who’s ever been able to reach beyond her emotional defenses. Little does she know he harbors a dangerous secret.

Barakiel accepted his solitary life after the rulers of his homeworld banished him to Earth, but his encounter with the fascinating Zan O’Gara changes everything. He knows he should stay away from her before his enemies make her a target. No matter. There’s no taming the unruly passion of a Covalent warrior.

As Zan’s investigation brings her closer to the truth about her lover, Barakiel realizes his presence on Earth has placed its most vulnerable citizens in danger. Compelled to protect them, he undertakes a series of duties he may not survive, even as Zan rescues him from a deadened heart.

“A tale about Lucifer’s son that deftly draws in readers with engrossing characters.”

— Kirkus Reviews

WARNING: This book contains foul language, violence, explicit sex, and sexual violence. Adults only! This is not a stand-alone novel, but the first in a five-part series. The romantic science fantasy continues in The Pain Season, Book II of the Covalent Series, available now.

Available via:

Amazon http://mybook.to/CovalentOne

Apple Books

Kobo

Walmart

Other retailers

Libby Doyle escapes real life by writing extravagant tales, filled with adventure, sex, and violence. When not tapping away at her fiction, she’s been known to work as an attorney and a journalist. She loves absurd humor, travel, hiking, punk rock, and her husband. Libby is the author of The Covalent Series, a romantic science fantasy in five parts. Read more at https://libbydoyle.com.

Interview with Author: Elizabeth Bromke

It is a pleasure to welcome Elizabeth Bromke author of Christmas on Maplewood Mountain (Book One in the Maplewood Sisters Series).

Welcome Elizabeth to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

Thank you, Patty! I’m really excited for this.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

Christmas on Maplewood Mountain is set in a tiny, fictional mountain town in Arizona. I, too, live in a small mountain town in Arizona, although it’s not Maplewood. However, I was born and raised in Tucson, a desert. Growing up, I always missed the seasons. In fact, fall leaves and snow were the stuff of fantasies for me, except for when my family would visit cooler climates. So, when my husband and I moved up to the mountains, I became a keen observer of “mountain life,” and I fell in love. I wanted to build a world in Maplewood, and one good way to do that was to create a family. I come from a very big family, and so the idea of four sisters and two brothers is based on my aunts and uncles. Fun fact: my dad has one brother and four sisters, and my mom has three sisters and two brothers. The Delaneys of Maplewood echo that dynamic.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

Some characters’ names or places are mini dedications to my family members. The characters are not based on real people, but I liked the idea of honoring them in a small way in the series. For example, I used my mom’s name for the bakery owner.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I have yet to meet a genre I didn’t like. I have a voracious appetite for reading. And, I’ve been writing since I was a young child. When I was a little girl, I wrote stories about big families with complicated (and confusing!) family dynamics. As I (hopefully) matured in my writing, I never shook the desire to explore relationships. Romance lends itself very well to this exploration. Plus, I love happy endings!

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

I feel less myself when I’m not engaging in creative pursuits. To me, sanity is synonymous with writing. It absorbs my anxieties. But, really the main condition of my contentment and happiness is… you guessed it! Family. In the book, even though they arrive at a major conflict in their sisterhood, Mary and Anna Delaney love each other and their siblings and parents deeply. Family is a driving force.

What makes you laugh?

It’s one of two extremes. I either laugh at the same things that 13-year-old boys laugh at or really smart humor.  My favorite TV show, however, is The Office. I’m not quite sure where it falls on that spectrum.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I am a huge fan of a variety of books/movies/people. For example, my favorite movies are The Wizard of Oz and Silence of the Lambs. I also love TitanicJaws, and Beetlejuice. Batman is my favorite superhero, and The Dark Knight is another favorite movie. Favorite books include Dracula, The Hunger Games, and anything by Jodi Picoult. I love psychological thrillers, too. Finally, I have a bizarre interest in Lizzie Borden of hatchet fame. My first historical fiction pieces revolve around her story.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

Readers can find me on website, elizabethbromke.com, my facebook author page, Elizabeth Bromke or on twitter @ElizabethBromke. Joining my newsletter is a surefire way to stay up-to-date with exclusive news and promotions. You can join here!

Christmas on Maplewood Mountain (Book One in the Maplewood Sisters Series) – releasing Saturday, November 17, 2018!

It’s December, and Mary Delaney has little to show for her tenth year at Wood Smoke Lodge. Her business has been steadily dwindling. Her relationship prospects, too. But, her sister, Anna, has an idea that just might change Mary’s luck. Unfortunately, their own sisterhood might be working against them. Worst of all, it’s all coming to a head during the holidays, making Mary feel lonelier than ever.

Meanwhile, Kurt Cutler is living the high life in the tech world. Fresh on the heels of wild success in the uncharted world of cryptocurrency, he looks for a way to ensure his young company doesn’t lose its grip. When his right-hand woman suggests a get-away at her sister’s snowy mountain retreat, he jumps on the opportunity to unplug and unwind.

If Mary’s sister, Anna, can back off, Mary has every chance of enjoying the magic of the holidays. But when Mary and Kurt have to choose between love and their own priorities, what will win?

Find out if a wintry weekend can become more for people from two opposite worlds in Elizabeth Bromke’s cozy romance, Christmas on Maplewood Mountain.

Interview With Author Tessa McFionn

It is a pleasure to welcome Tessa McFionn author of The Rise of the Stria series.

Welcome Tessa to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

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What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

My latest series, The Rise of the Stria, is a space opera which has been spinning in my mind for many years now. I pitched the first book, To Discover a Divine, as The Wizard of Oz meets Star Wars. At the time, the work was entitled Lost in Transmigration, but the feedback on the title was less than anticipated. Seems people thought, by the title, this was going to be a comedy, or at least a light rom-com. And that would be a big negative there, Ghost Rider. So, after several heart-to-hearts with my wonderful publishing team at Fiery Seas Publishing, we came up with the current title. The story centers around a human, Evainne Wagner, who gets sucked into another galaxy only to find out she is some sort of mystical savior eluded to in an ancient prophecy, and it will follow her as she learns of her role and navigates the intense attraction to our hero, a captain in the Strian rebel forces, Kahlym cal Jheun.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

Ah, the names. Actually, I find myself discovering new character names in the oddest of ways. One fun way is watching the credits at the ends of movies. I have always stayed until the bitter end in the theater. Sometimes because I wanted to know who sang a particular song or where a movie was shot, but during the wait, I would read the names. My husband and I actually play a game where we try to find the funniest, or longest, or coolest name in the credits. By watching all the names scroll by, my author brain is on high alert for the next hero, heroine, villain or sidekick in the long list. But, in the case of my sci-fi, it was a little different. For my heroine, I have always loved the name Evainne. I first heard it in Neil Gaiman’s work, Starlight, and I just loved it. As to the aliens, those are tough. I mean, you don’t really think you’re going to come across a spaceman named Bob, right? I wanted to make the names look exotic, but still be pronounceable. So, Callum became Kahlym and Darrin became Dhaerin. For the others, don’t laugh, but I stared at my keyboard and started with one letter then built the names up from there. Granted, this is a very trial and error method. I thought to myself, what kinds of word sounds made me think happy thoughts and which sounded evil. I tried to give my good guys soothing sounds while the harsher tones were aimed toward the bad guys. Like I said, I know it sounds silly, but it works for me.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I have been a nerd for the whole of my life. My mother used to read to me and my brother when we were little. She read anything and everything. We heard The Yearling, Old Yeller, Jaws, (LOL! Yes, I heard the story before the movie was made) and The Hobbit. I remember when my grandmother gave me a copy of Robert Heinlein’s Starship Troopers. I was in the fourth grade and I was so excited. The opening line used the word “xenomorph” and I had to read the rest of it with the dictionary next to me. But I didn’t care. I was hooked. I am old enough to say that I was there the day they released Star Wars in the theaters. I remember looking over my shoulder when the space ship zoomed in from off-camera, cheering for the good guys and booing Darth Vader. After that, I continued to devour all things fantastical. I read Asimov, Bradbury, all of the Dune books. My mother even enrolled me in the Science Fiction/Fantasy Book of the Month club, which is why I dedicate each and every book I write to her memory. She is my biggest inspiration and was my most steadfast supporter, even though she never had a chance to read my works.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

Wait, we have to be sane to do this?! Nobody told me that!!! All kidding aside, for me, since I do have a full-time day job, it’s all about time management. It’s a bit of the “all work and no play” mentality. I try to make sure to get words on pages every day, but I try, she said incredulously, I try NOT to beat myself up if I don’t. I personally tend to be rather scattered. Yes, I am a pantser and can get distracted by shiny objects. (Just ask my hubby. He calls it my magpie complex.) So, I create characters who can think on their feet and multitask like it’s cool. I don’t really have any strongly organized characters just yet, only because I’m not sure how to approach that myself.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

That’s the beauty about writing science fiction: not a whole lot of available information on a fictitious part of the universe. If anything, I guess what you could call it is anti-research. It’s more about checking around to make sure your device/concept/planetary system isn’t already being used by someone else out there. But you still have to make things believable and relatable, and therein lies the rub. When I first started writing my space opera, I had the Alliance as the good guys, but that only sparked my memories of watching Firefly and Serenity, even though they were the bad guys in that world. So, after numerous synonym searches (thank you, thesaurus.com and my Flip Dictionary), I found a very distant cousin, twice removed on their mother’s side I would venture to guess. I rewatched lots of Star Trek reruns and Googled lots of ship components. But even then, things can go sideways. I was 90% done with the first draft and my ship’s three-armed tech/mechanic was named Warwick. I was so pleased with my somewhat obscure choice of names and took a break to read and POOF! There, as bold as day, was Warwick, out in print. So, back to the drawing board, a little switcharoo and Warwick becomes Falka, and the cleric, who was originally Falco, becomes Yhan’tu. Now, would others have made the connection? I don’t know, but if I want to set my stories apart, then maybe it means making some changes when needed.

What makes you laugh?

EVERYTHING!! I love to laugh. I consider myself to be more of an optimist than a pessimist, and I try to keep things on a positive note. This means lots of laughter and lots of smiles. My current go-to for a good giggle is a series of short videos called True Facts. OMG! If you haven’t seen these yet, they are just hysterical. They’re little nature videos about strange animals and they are just brilliant. The narrator reminds me a little of a young version of Morgan Freeman and he starts out so serious, but ends up cracking himself up throughout the episode with the facts or the videos of the animals. There is one about seahorses and he acquaints the way seahorses move to riding a skateboard and waving a Denny’s menu really fast to move. I believe that laughter is the best way to learn about people and to stay healthy.

What makes you cry?

Not much? I know, that makes me sound so heartless. But, like I said above, I try to be optimistic about things. But, if I am truly moved emotionally, I will shed a tear or two. This can happen when I see someone rise up against all odds and succeed, or when someone inspires others to rise up. For me, it’s all about the journey. I cry when I see the little kitties climb up from the edge of the abyss, or when I watch my students completely nail a performance in front of a packed house. I don’t cry in normal movies. I thought E.T. was boring and Terms of Endearment didn’t move me either. I also don’t watch sappy movies. LMAO! I know, I know! What kind of romance author am I?! But, I did cry when Spock died in Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan and when Gandalf fell in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

Since my life has surrounded the nerd culture for the whole of my life, I have lots of fandoms that influence me. I have also been surrounded by the performing arts and these have been woven into a couple of my heroines in my paranormal series. In my first book, Spirit Fall, my heroine is a dancer disillusioned with life and is brought down from the edge of suicide by a handsome hero. My third book in that same series, Spirit Song, tells of a torch singer held prisoner by a sleazy mobster in Chicago and finds an unlikely savior in a reluctant Guardian Warrior. It’s hard not to infuse some of yourself into your stories. Everyone does drink coffee. That is a requirement. I even found a way to make coffee appear in a different universe. It’s that serious.

Is there anything else you want to add about the story, series that has not already been mentioned?

This is only the beginning. I wrote To Discover a Divine with the idea of it only being a trilogy, but my muse wasn’t having any of that. So, this is the gateway to a whole new universe of tales from the Dantaran Galaxy and I hope to share many more stories as times goes on.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

I’m a bit old school and I really do like Facebook. However, that being said, I am on Twitter and Instagram as well. I answer emails, my semaphore and smoke signals are a bit weak, but I’d be willing to brush up on them if needed. Just drop by my website, my Amazon Author page or find me on the interwebs.

Interview with Author Catherine Cerveny

It is a pleasure to welcome Catherine Cerveny author of the Felicia Sevigny series.

Welcome Catherine to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

All the novels in the Felicia Sevigny series refer to luck. In the first book, we learn that the main character has a weird genetic quirk known as the luck gene that essentially ensure events always go in her favor—even when things seem to be going badly for Felicia. In the first novel, she learns there are rules for the luck gene, hence the title THE RULE OF LUCK. But it also refers to the fact that her life is controlled and ruled by luck—she just never realized it. In the second book, THE CHAOS OF LUCK, she hopes things will run more smoothly for her, but they don’t. The luck gene throws all her careful plans, including her love life, into chaos and makes her feel like luck’s pawn. In the third and final novel of the trilogy, THE GAME OF LUCK, Felicia finally asserts control over her life. She refuses to be used like a chess piece and is determined to take charge rather than be used and manipulated by those in her life, and by her own luck gene. If luck sees her life as a game, she’s determined to win it once and for all.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

I love it when the characters’ names mean something or there’s some hidden mystery behind them, although I don’t always go out of my way to make it happen when I’m selecting names. Sometimes, I just like how the name sounds or looks on the page. In the case of THE GAME OF LUCK, Felicia’s name means “lucky” and since this book was about a woman who discovers she has a luck gene, I thought the name was really appropriate. As for the male lead Alexei Petriv, the name Alexei means “helper and defender of mankind” which I thought was a great fit given his overall character arc. At the beginning of the series, he’s a very flawed character, merely following orders as he pushes the Tsarist Consortium’s agenda regardless of what it might mean to humanity’s future. He sees himself as being set apart from humanity but not of it. However by the end, he is transformed into someone who wants to protect what it means to be human and take a role in determining its destiny.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I’ve always loved science fiction—and space in general. I love the “what if” questions sci-fi poses and the mysteries it explores. Are there really aliens out there? What are other planets like and can we live on them? What would it take a terraform another planet? How would we get there? I also love the action and adventure angle, where characters were actually doing something instead of standing around and talking. Plus I love seeing characters fall in love in such adverse conditions, watching their relationship form in a pressure cooker, so to speak. When I was a kid growing up, I was exposed to a lot of action and adventure movies—Star Wars of course, but also Star Trek, and Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Spider-man, Doctor Who, and so on. I read comics and played with action figures (by the way, Barbie and Han Solo can totally get married if they want to). I wanted to go to Narnia and Camelot and Fantasia, or anywhere that wasn’t ordinary life. So, I would have to say I was inspired to write in the science fiction genre by a childhood spent indulging my imagination and always wondering “what if”.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

In The Game of Luck, I actually spent a lot of time researching dogs. I wanted Felicia and Alexei to have a dog, though I don’t have one myself—I seem to be allergy to everything these days. Given that I don’t know very much about dogs, I spent a lot of time researching dog breeds and behaviors, and asking friends to share their funny dog stories. So while I was researching planet terraforming and genetic manipulation, I was also trying to decide what sort of dog I wanted my characters to have—a Russian spaniel, by the way.

What makes you laugh?

My sense of humor is pretty dry and sarcasm is my go-to-move. I love wry, self-aware humor that’s a little off-beat and out in left field. You may not get it right away and you might have to work for it, but once you do, it’s that much more enjoyable. One of my favorite TV shows of all-time is the US version of “The Office”, which not everyone gets or finds funny, but I adore. I think that same wry sense of humor is in my novels, or I like to imagine it is.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

The best way to interact with me is probably on Twitter. I’m on there most often. I just started with Instagram so the landscape there is pretty dry and dusty, but I’m trying to remember to post things there as well. Readers can also reach me through the contact form on my website. And of course, I’m on Goodreads and be reached there as well. I do have a Facebook page where I post things, but it’s more for family and close friends.

Interview with an Author: Michelle M. Pillow

It is a pleasure to welcome Michelle M. Pillow author of Space Lords 4: His Earth Maiden.

Welcome Michelle to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your stories better.

Thank you for having me!

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

The Space Lords series was a series installment in the sci-fi romance Qurilixen World collection. It came naturally as the characters from previous series (Dragon Lords, Lords of the Var) began leaving their planet for the high skies. The titles of the Space Lords series has to do with a curse the pirate crew received while “visiting” a planet. Each part of the curse relates to a different element on that planet, thus: His Frost Maiden, His Fire Maiden, His Metal Maiden, His Earth Maiden. Wood will be the next element.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I started writing historical romances and thought I would never do anything else. In 2004, after my first book a Regency ghost story romance, the publisher contacted me because they needed authors to fill out their Sci Fi Romance list. I agreed with the idea that I’d do this one thing for them, and then get to back to historical “my true passion.” Those first Sci Fi books, Dragon Lords, a futuristic dragonshifter series, grew into the Quirlixen World collection with 34 books within 7 series installments and growing.

It’s comical to think of now since I don’t write historical much anymore. My career took off from there, and I now I’m best known for futuristic, sci-fi and paranormal romance. However, I’ve written in a lot of different genres—contemporary, historical, fantasy, paranormal, urban fantasy, etc—and have recently released my third cozy mystery.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

It’s doing things away from the computer to refill the creative well. Often, that is when the best ideas strike, or I’ll be doing research for a book. Experiencing something makes you better versed to write it. Not that I can take off into spaceships, but I can tour a ghost town like what is in my newest cozy mystery, or I can interview an expert in paranormal investigations on their techniques, or climb Mayan Temples in Belize.

What makes you laugh?

I love to laugh. My husband and I joke around all the time. Usually it’s the silliest stuff.

What makes you cry?

Grey’s Anatomy. Everyone kept recommending it so I recently binge watched it and I think I cried like every episode. My husband probably thought something was seriously wrong with me. LOL

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I absolute LOVE horror movies. Scary, campy, phycological, it doesn’t matter. I have some darker books, the series Tribes of the Vampire, that does reflect a horror quality. I’d love to be able to write a straight thriller or horror if time allowed.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

I love talking to my readers online. They can usually find me on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Michelle M. Pillow, Author

NYT & USAT Bestselling Author Michelle M. Pillow is an award-winning romance writer with over 100 published books over the course of her nearly 15-year career. She is best known for her Quirlixen World including the series: Dragon Lords, Space Lords, Lords of the Var, Galaxy Alien Mail Order Brides, and more.

Michelle is always up for a new adventure or challenge, whether it’s a paranormal investigation of an old Vaudeville Theatre or climbing Mayan temples in Belize. She was a refugee extra on SyFy’s Z Nation (2016).

Website: www.michellepillow.com

Qurilixen World: https://michellepillow.com/dragonlords/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorMichellePillow/

Twitter: http://twitter.com/MichellePillow

Instagram: https://instagram.com/michellempillow/

Upcoming/Newest Release:

Better Haunts and Garden Gnomes, (Un)Lucky Valley Book 1, Cozy Mystery Paranormal Romantic Comedy

Available starting June 26, 2018

Welcome to Lucky Valley where nothing is quite what it seems.

Lily Goode wasn’t aware she had an inheritance waiting for her in the form of a huge Victorian house in Lucky Valley, Colorado. Life might finally be coming together for her. That is if you don’t count the endless home repairs, dealing with eccentric Aunt Polly who claims they’re both witches, and Nolan Dawson the handsome home inspector who seems to have it out for her, then, sure, life is grand. Oh, and not to mention the strange hallucinations and garden gnomes who are far more than lawn ornaments.

If mysterious accidents don’t do her in, then the rebellious gnomes just might. With the help of Aunt Polly, it’s up to Lily to discover who’s sabotaging her new home and trying to drive the Goodes out of Lucky Valley once and for all.

Interview with AR DeClerck

It is a pleasure to welcome author AR DeClerck to talk about the story Bound To You.

Welcome AR to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your story better!

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

Bound to You is the basic premise of the story, to be honest. The characters experience a bond that syncs them physically and psychically and makes it difficult to deny their attraction.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to? I have always adored SFR and I love reading it. I knew I wanted to write about characters who find love through adventure, and what better backdrop than space?

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others? This novel required some research into energy, wormholes, travel in space, giant bugs that look like crickets, and biochemical syncing of two bodies. It was loads of fun!

What makes you laugh?

Irony makes me laugh. When someone gets what’s coming to them, but doesn’t realize it til the end (good or bad) I chuckle a little. Animal videos, too, of course!

What makes you cry?

Those sappy sad declarations of love, especially at the moment when it seems all is lost and the person has to break down and say what they really feel before it’s too late. Those always get me.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I love Firefly, Sherlock, Killjoys and Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency. I think you’ll see a little of everything in my stories, especially the idea of those close connections to the people around you and how they shape your decisions and your life.

What is the best way for readers to interact with you?

Find me on facebook at www.facebook.com/authoramydeclerck and join me on Pinterest at www.pinterest.com/amydeclerck

Bound To You is on sale until 02/01/2018 at Amazon, iBooks, BN.com, Kobo, Indigo, Angus Robertson

AR DeClerck is a wife, mother, and writer who lives in the Upper Midwest with her family, two spoiled dogs and a wily cat. She spends her nights on the couch writing romances filled with adventure, sadness, joy and love. She’s always looking for the next great romance.

Find AR at www.ardeclerck.com
www.Twitter.com/@ARDeClerck
Join her newsletter http://amyreadsandwrites.blogspot.com/p/newsletter-sign-ups.html

And find updated links to all her books (available at all retailers) http://amyreadsandwrites.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html

Interview with author Cassy Campbell

It is a pleasure to welcome author Cassy Campbell, who recently released the Sci-Fi Romance, Dreamland: City of Gold, which is Book 1 of the Dreamland series.

    

Welcome Cassy to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your story better.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

I just wanted a cool, memorable title to start off this spinoff series. The first series, Travelers, is set in Area 51, which is also called Dreamland. So that seemed like the perfect title for this new series that ties to Travelers. Plus, Dreamland calls up all the alien conspiracies surrounding Area 51, it’s mysterious, and it ties to the plot of the story, in which two of my characters dream of distant events. The working title was actually just City of Gold for the whole year and a half I was writing it, but do you know how many City of Golds there are out in bookland? Me neither, but it’s a lot. So Dreamland: City of Gold, seemed to differentiate it a bit.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you?
If so, give a few examples…

I always try to pick names that don’t relate to anyone in my personal life. I don’t want anyone coming to me thinking I wrote a book about them! Especially since my characters are really people in and of themselves. They would be angry if they didn’t get their own identities. That said, I usually try to play around with something that seems to fit them, either their personalities or their roles in the story.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I read scifi and have since I was in gradeschool, and those are always the most interesting stories to me, so that is what I naturally gravitate to when I write. My stories usually start with some kind of what-if, and I just find the most exciting questions to me as a writer are set in a science-based fantasy world.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

Haha, I wish I knew! I don’t write full-time, but I think if I did, I’d have a better chance of maintaining my sanity than I do now. My key, I suppose, is making sure I keep track of my time, and schedule everything I have to do every day. I write down lists for every day, and check off the items when they’re finished. If I don’t write it down, it’s not getting done.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

For this novel, most of my research was about the Navy, which I hadn’t written much of before, and about the Bermuda Triangle and at-sea disappearances. That didn’t seem much like work! I learned about a lot of things that just didn’t fit into the book, but research for a writer is never wasted. Maybe those things will show up somewhere else in my work someday.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I am a huge fan of a lot of scifi—books, movies, tv. I think anything a writer experiences is reflected in her work, at least peripherally. We are the sum of our experiences and our books are the conscious focusing of everything swimming around in the soup we call our minds, so yeah, something I love to watch is going to influence what I write, or at least maybe spark an idea that goes, “Hey, what if…?”

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Again, thank you Cassy for answering these questions and helping us to become better acquainted with both the Dreamland: City of Gold and yourself.

   

Dreamland: City of Gold now available

amazon.com | ibooks | bn.com | kobo 

About Cassy Campbell

Cassy Campbell grew up in the frozen tundra of the Far North. Perhaps not surprisingly, the long dark winters encouraged her love affair with stories from an early age, and one of her favorite things is still curling up under a blanket with a book. Once she realized that she loved to write stories as much as read them, she realized the world was hers (at least the ones in her books). She became a member of the Romance Writers of America, the Wisconsin RWA, and the rest is history. She currently lives in the much balmier climate of the Not As Far North where she is, at this moment, likely daydreaming her way through her next story. You can visit Cassy’s Website, http://cassycampbell.com, follow her Facebook Page, www.facebook.com/cassycampbellbooks or via Twitter: @Cassy_Campbell

Interview with author Cynthia Sax

It is a pleasure to welcome USA Today bestselling author Cynthia Sax, who recently released the Sci-Fi Romance, Releasing Rage.

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Welcome Cynthia to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to help us get to know you and your story better.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

I can’t imagine calling Releasing Rage, my latest cyborg SciFi romance, anything other than that. Rage is the cyborg hero’s name. He’s enslaved by humans, forced to fight their wars and follow their orders. He plots to free himself, to be ‘released.’
He also vents much of his anger toward his masters and their injustices they inflict on him and his cyborg brethren. He releases his rage. (grins)
Releasing Rage is a dark book. The title signifies this.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you?If so, give a few examples…

Cyborgs are normally assigned a model number by their manufacturers and then they might choose to give themselves a name. The hero of Releasing Rage chooses to call himself Rage because he’s often angered by the injustices inflicted on him and his cyborg brethren. He’s a primitive, passionate male and has a primitive, passionate name.
Joan Tull, the human heroine, is a former agri lot gal (i.e. farm girl). Jethro Tull is one of the most recognized innovators in agriculture. Joan is also on a mission, much like another famous Joan – Joan of Arc.
(grins) Yes, I put quite a bit of thought into a character’s name. It is so key to his or her identity.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

I love reading cyborg SciFi romances. Writers such as Laurann Dohner, Eve Langlais, and Mina Carter inspired me to write my own stories.
There were two things that I really wanted to explore.

1) What would cause cyborgs to rebel against their manufacturers? As they’re designed to be the perfect soldiers, loyal and true, I figured it had to be something dark and serious.

2) Cyborg babies—how do cyborgs reproduce? Yes, the early cyborgs were essentially ‘repaired’ human soldiers but eventually, military forces would wish to mass produce them. How would that happen?
Of course, I also wanted to tell a great story with plenty of hot, sexy romance and some spectacular explosions.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

The myth of the solitary writer, working away by herself in a dark attic, is exactly that—a myth. Success in every field is a team sport and writing is no exception. I owe my sanity to my fellow writers, especially Wylie Snow, J.K. Coi, Amy Ruttan, and Christine d’Abo, whom I email every day.
In Releasing Rage, Rage, the hero, might be one of the best warriors in the universe, but he depends on his fellow cyborgs, especially Crash and Gap. When they plan for their escape, they plan for ALL of them to escape, leaving no warrior behind.

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

Releasing Rage required quite a bit of research. For example: I have files and files of theories on how cyborgs might reproduce. I talked to scientists, product developers, other experts.
It’s very important to me that SciFi romance is based on science. That science might not be in the story (much of my research is shared on my blog) but we, writers, should know it. This sets the genre apart from… say… paranormal romance (which is based on myth).

What makes you laugh?

My dear wonderful hubby makes me laugh every dang day. You’ll always find some humor in even my darkest stories because I feel a shared sense of humor is essential for a lasting relationship.

What makes you cry?

I’m a sap. Hallmark commercials make me cry. I cry when I’m happy, when I’m sad, when I’m emotionally moved. I was completing the final read of Breathing Vapor (the follow up story to Releasing Rage) last night and crying my eyes out. It doesn’t take much!

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I’m definitely a super fan of SciFi romance, cyborg stories in particular. The internal conflict between man and machine, between loyal soldier and independent warrior, between following orders and following our own paths, fascinates me.
I love reading in the genre I’m writing because I then know that I’m bringing something new to it.

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Thank you again Cynthia for the interview and through your answers helping us get to know you better.

Half Man. Half Machine. All Hers.
Rage, the Humanoid Alliance’s most primitive cyborg, has two goals–kill all of the humans on his battle station and escape to the Homeland. The warrior has seen the darkness in others and in himself. He believes that’s all he’s been programmed to experience.
Until he meets Joan.
Joan, the battle station’s first female engineer, has one goal–survive long enough to help the big sexy cyborg plotting to kill her. Rage might not trust her but he wants her. She sees the passion in his eyes, the caring in his battle-worn hands, the gruff emotion in his voice.
When Joan survives the unthinkable, Rage’s priorities are tested. Is there enough room in this cyborg’s heart for both love and revenge?

Releasing Rage is now available at the following retailers:

Amazon US: http://www.amazon.com/Releasing-Rage-Cyborg-Sizzle-Book-ebook/dp/B00ZOL1DRO

Amazon UK: http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00ZOL1DRO/

ARe: https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-releasingrage-1850041-340.html

B&N: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/releasing-rage-cynthia-sax/1122455646

About Cynthia Sax
USA Today bestselling author Cynthia Sax writes contemporary, SciFi and paranormal erotic romances. Her stories have been featured in Star Magazine, Real Time With Bill Maher, and numerous best of erotic romance top ten lists.
Sign up for her dirty-joke-filled release day newsletter and visit her on the web at www.CynthiaSax.com
You can also follow her Facebook Page, Twitter: @CynthiaSax or her Blog: TasteOfCyn.com

Interview with author Jenna Bennett

It is a pleasure to welcome Jenna Bennett (Jennie Bentley), who is a New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of the Do It Yourself home renovation mysteries for Berkley Prime Crime and the Savannah Martin real estate mysteries for her own gratification. She also writes a variety of romance for a change of pace, including the award-winning Soldiers of Fortune science fiction series.

Welcome Jenna to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl and thanks so much for taking the time out your busy schedule to talk about your Soldiers of Fortune series.

What does the title of this novel, series or set of stories signify?

The books in the series (so far) are Fortune’s Hero and Fortune’s Honor.

The Good Fortune is a space freighter whose crew was arrested for ferrying weapons to the insurgents on a planet called Marica, which is under siege by Rhenian forces, the military from a neighboring planet called Rhene. The Rhenians are afraid of invasion into their nexus through a wormhole in Marican space, and because Marica is a poor, agricultural planet without much in the way of defensive forces, they’ve decided they ought to go in and ‘protect’ Marica.

Fortune’s Hero is Quinn, the captain of the Good Fortune. When the first book starts, he’s captive in the prison colony on the moon Marica-3, being put to the question. He escapes, and then spends the rest of the book trying to figure out how to get back into the prison to get the rest of his crew out.

And Fortune’s Honor is about the ship’s translator, a young man named Holden Sinclair. In the second book, the crew has made it downside to the planet Marica. Holden comes across Quinn’s old girlfriend, who was the one who betrayed them to the Rhenians in the first place, and has to make a decision about whether to leave her in the bad place she’s in, or help her get away.

Do the names of the characters in your novel have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

Not to me personally, but I do think about the meaning of the names when I name my characters. Quinn’s last name is Conlan – Irish – which means hero. Holden Sinclair’s last name means clear and bright. Elsa Brandeis is Quinn’s love interest in Book 1, and her last name is made up of Brand and Eis, which means Fire and Ice in a combination of Northern European/Germanic languages. Quinn calls her the Ice Bitch, until he gets to know her.

What prompted you to write in this genre and who or what inspired you to?

That’s a long story…

Back in February of 2010, I was a member of a group blog called The Working Stiffs. It was mostly a group of mystery writers, which is mostly what I am.

One of our members was named Wilfred Bereswill, and he loved to write short fiction. I, on the other hand, can’t write anything short, and Will knew it. For February 2010, he challenged us all to a flash fiction contest: write a complete story in 200 words. (He told me later he made it 200 instead of 100 because he knew at 100, I’d simply refuse to try.)

Nobody else seemed to have a problem, and I’m nothing if not competitive, so I kept at it until I had something resembling a complete story that was exactly 200 words. (I had to massage it to get there. It was more when I first wrote it.) And for some reason, it was about this guy sitting in a prison on the outer edge of the back-beyond of space, wanting to die. I had never considered writing SF before – although I do occasionally read it – but that’s the character that came into my mind for the story.

Funnily enough, when we posted the stories on the blog and invited the readers to guess who had written what story, everyone thought Will had written mine.

I didn’t do anything more with it for six months or so, but Quinn kept popping into my head every so often. He had a story he wanted me to tell, and he wasn’t about to be quiet until I did. I finally gave in.

I eventually sold the series to a publisher as a four-book series, so I got the last laugh after all. I really can’t write anything short.

Will passed away a couple of years ago, very suddenly, but not before the first book was released, and dedicated to him.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and do your characters reflect some of these attributes?

Having a sense of humor, I guess. It’s pretty important for survival in any situation, whether as a writer or not. And yes, the first book is full of gallows humor. Quinn knows he probably won’t survive, isn’t even sure he wants to survive, but he manages to find the humor in the situations he’s in anyway.

What makes you laugh?

I’m a typical writer. I love word puns. 🙂

What kind of research did you have to do for the novel, series or set of stories that was different from others?

I’m really not an SF writer, so I had research space and space ships and physics and all sorts of things like that. Boring stuff. I’d much rather just write a story about people, you know? People are the interesting things.

What are you a fan of and is this reflected in your writing?

I’m a huge fan of Lois McMaster Bujold, so there are similarities to her books. And while I wouldn’t say I’m a fan, I grew up in Europe, where the memories of WWII were still alive and well while I was a girl. My parents lived through it, and so did several of my teachers. My mother would get very uncomfortable every time the air raid siren would go off, even though she knew they were just testing to make sure the sirens still worked. I had blackout curtains on my windows into the 1970s and 80s. We used them as roller shades at night. As a result of growing up with constant reminders of The War, the Rhenians have some distinctly Nazi-like traits. A lot of what I write deals with racial prejudice in some way, and this series is no exception. I also like things like real estate and architecture – former real estate agent – so all my books are full of descriptions of buildings.

What’s next?

There’s supposed to be two more books in the series: Fortune’s Hope and Fortune’s Hour. The first is about Toby Flatt, the Good Fortune’s mechanic, and the last about Isaac Miller, a mercenary who’s been riding with the crew for a couple of years, keeping them safe. They’re long and complicated books to write, though, so it’ll probably take me a couple of years to get there, in between the mysteries. After that, I have an idea for a romantic suspense sort of story set on a space station (most likely) in a different universe than this one, but who knows if I’ll ever get around to writing it. Too many ideas, not enough time.

# # #

Again, thank you Jenna for answering these questions and helping us to become better acquainted with both the Soldiers of Fortune series and yourself.

For more information about Jenna Bennett, like her on Facebook, follow her on Twitter or visit her website, www.jennabennett.com, which includes additional information on the Soldiers of Fortune series.

Recent Adventure: My Interview with Author Cat Devon

Today, I am excited to introduce author Cat Devon, who is a former librarian and, like me, a confessed bookaholic. She has recently written a new series of paranormal romance novels set in Chicago, IL.

I have already read the first two novels in this series and, between the dialog and the variety of characters, these are a delight to read. Full disclosure: I have known Cat for many years and I am a member of her Street Crew. I thought a good forum to spread the word about her new series is through a series of unusual interview questions for a blog post. I hope that you enjoy these unusual questions and Cat’s responses.

Welcome Cat to The Adventures of the Everyday Fangirl!

What do the titles of these novels signify?

My editor, Jennifer Enderlin, is one of the top editors in the business. She is Kristin Hannah’s editor. She came up with the first title which is a spin on the word Enemy. She used Entity instead. The following two titles THE ENTITY WITHIN and LOVE YOUR ENTITY were a brainstorming collaboration between us. And coming out Oct 15 is my holiday enovella THE ENTITY WHO CAME FOR CHRISTMAS which was another of my editor’s brilliant ideas! I also absolutely love the covers that she and the art department have come up with for these books!

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Does the names of the characters in your Entity novels have some sort of significance or importance to you? If so, give a few examples…

Nick St. George, the hero of SLEEPING WITH THE ENTITY, shares the name of St. George who saves the princess from the dragon. I love the flow of Daniella Delaney (and love the actress Dana Delaney).

What prompted you to move into this romance sub-genre?

My editor asked if I would be interested in writing paranormal romances with humor and I was eager to try as I had some story ideas.

What are the most important attributes to remaining sane as a writer and does your characters reflect some of these attributes?

A sense of humor! It is a lifesaver and has helped me survive some very tough times. My characters have a sense of humor as well. My books feature heat and humor as well as fast-paced dialogue and heart.

What kind of research did you have to do for these novels that was different from other novels you have written?

I had to research cupcakes! I did that thanks to my local cupcake shop Sugar Monkey. The owner gave me a tour and some baking secrets. I also researched historical elements like Gettysburg or World War I or Catherine the Great from Russia. I researched vampire lore as well as other paranormal elements. Then some fun stuff like shoes from the 1920’s!

What makes you laugh?

Funny cat videos! Darynda Jones book FIRST GRAVE ON THE RIGHT and also Tessa Dare’s Spindle Cove historical romance series. And of course books by Jayne Ann Krentz and Susan Elizabeth Phillips!

What makes you cry?

Lots of things! Emotional commercials, beautiful music, feel good stories

Thank you for sitting down and taking the time out of your busy writing schedule to answering these questions!

To read an excerpt of Cat’s book SLEEPING WITH THE ENTITY check out her website www.catdevon.com and for fun updates and info Like her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/catdevonauthor

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